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Thread: NEW Bird Flu

  1. #21
    Distinguished Community Member Abby2006's Avatar
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    Sally do you really ot want to know how this thing is progressing?

    I went through the ringer out here in 2008 and begging people not to get those shots

    All I can say is just do that thing where y ou cannot see my post I really do not want to cause anyone any harm that is not my intent.

    Abby

    ********************************



    Two die after h7n9 bird flu virus develops drug resistance

    The Lancet reports that H7N9 is already showing the ability to mutate to avoid treatment with Tamiflu


    James Meikle
    The Guardian, Tuesday 28 May 2013 18.13 BST

    Tamiflu tablets are already proving ineffective against some cases of the H7N9 virus. Photograph: Marianna Day Massey/ZUMA/Corbis


    Scientists have found the first cases of the new bird flu virus proving resistant to treatment with Tamiflu or similar drugs. The virus has so far killed 36 people in China and been confirmed in 95 others.

    The analysis of the course of the H7N9 bird flu virus and use of antivirals in 14 patients, reported in the Lancet medical journal, found that three severely ill people did not respond to the group of medicines that are the standard weapon against threatened flu pandemics. Two died and the third still needed specialist equipment to oxygenate their blood at the time the research paper was submitted.

    The authors, from Shanghai and Hong Kong, said that in these cases genetic testing showed a mutation. In one patient, it seemed to have occurred after the infection took hold, probably as a result of the treatment.
    They said: "The apparent ease with which antiviral resistance emerges in (H7N9) viruses is concerning: it needs to be closely monitored and considered in future pandemic response plans."

    However, they said that in most cases, treatment with oseltamivir (Tamiflu) "even when started 48 hours or more after disease onset, was associated with falling viral load in most patients … Therefore, early treatment of suspected or confirmed cases is strongly encouraged".

    The same message was given by the World Health Organisation, which said scientists at its collaborating centre in Beijing had found "discrepancies" in samples of virus tested in laboratory conditions but not linked to clinical cases. But the study, as yet unpublished, did not differentiate between resistance and possible impurities.

    It believed neuraminidase inhibitors – the group of treatments to which Tamiflu belongs – could still be effective. "Based on this, our treatment recommendations have not changed: the potential severity of H7N9-associated illness warrants recommending that all confirmed cases, probable cases, and H7N9 cases under investigation, receive antiviral treatment with a neuraminidase inhibitor drug as early as possible."

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/theguardian
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  2. #22
    Distinguished Community Member Abby2006's Avatar
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    I have decided NOT to keep doing the updates, all I've wanted to do what not let this thing catch unprepared.

    Abby
    Stand for something or you will fall for anything

  3. #23
    Distinguished Community Member SalpalSally's Avatar
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    An important message about this once is fine, but not a barrage of them.
    I'm scared enough from all of these storm/tornado warnings all the time..EEK!!
    Love, Sally


    "The best way out is always through". Robert Frost







  4. #24
    Distinguished Community Member Abby2006's Avatar
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    Just a Update

    Abby

    --------------------------------


    First Probable Person to Person Transmission of New Bird Flu Virus in China; But H7N9 Is Not Able to Spread Efficiently Between Humans

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0806203509.htm

    Aug. 6, 2013


    he first report of probable person to person transmission of the new avian influenza A (H7N9) virus in Eastern China has just been published.

    The findings provide the strongest evidence yet of H7N9 transmission between humans, but the authors stress that its ability to transmit itself is "limited and non-sustainable."

    Avian influenza A (H7N9) virus was recently identified in Eastern China. As of 30 June 2013, 133 cases have been reported, resulting in 43 deaths.

    Most cases appear to have visited live poultry markets or had close contact with live poultry 7-10 days before illness onset. Currently no definite evidence indicates sustained human-to-human transmission of the H7N9 virus.

    The study reports a family cluster of two patients (father and daughter) with H7N9 virus infection in Eastern China in March 2013.

    The first (index) patient -- a 60 year old man -- regularly visited a live poultry market and became ill five to six days after his last exposure to poultry. He was admitted to hospital on 11 March.

    When his symptoms became worse, he was transferred to the hospital's intensive care unit (ICU) on 15 March. He was transferred to another ICU on March 18 and died of multi-organ failure on 4 May.

    The second patient, his healthy 32 year old daughter, had no known exposure to live poultry before becoming sick. However, she provided direct and unprotected bedside care for her father in the hospital before his admission to intensive care.

    She developed symptoms six days after her last contact with her father and was admitted to hospital on 24 March. She was transferred to the ICU on 28 March and died of multi-organ failure on 24 April.

    Two almost genetically identical virus strains were isolated from each patient, suggesting transmission from father to daughter.

    Forty-three close contacts of both cases were interviewed by public health officials and tested for influenza virus. Of these, one (a son in law who helped care for the father) had mild illness, but all contacts tested negative for H7N9 infection.

    Environmental samples from poultry cages, water at two local poultry markets, and swans from the residential area, were also tested. One strain was isolated but was genetically different to the two strains isolated from the patients.

    The researchers acknowledge some study limitations, but say that the most likely explanation for this family cluster of two cases with H7N9 infection is that the virus "transmitted directly from the index patient to his daughter." But they stress that "the virus has not gained the ability to transmit itself sustained from person to person efficiently."

    They believe that the most likely source of infection for the index case was the live poultry market, and conclude: "To our best knowledge, this is the first report of probable transmissibility of the novel virus person to person with detailed epidemiological, clinical, and virological data. Our findings reinforce that the novel virus possesses the potential for pandemic spread."

    So does this imply that H7N9 has come one step closer towards adapting fully to humans, ask James Rudge and Richard Coker from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, based in Bangkok, in an accompanying editorial?

    Probably not, they say. Limited transmission between humans "is not surprising, and does not necessarily indicate that the virus is on course to develop sustained transmission among humans."

    Nevertheless, they point to several traits of H7N9 are of particular concern, and conclude that, while this study might not suggest that H7N9 is any closer to delivering the next pandemic, "it does provide a timely reminder of the need to remain extremely vigilant: the threat posed by H7N9 has by no means passed."

    Dr Zhou says that the reason for carrying out this study was because there was "no definite evidence to show that the novel virus can transmit person-to-person," plus she and her co-authors wanted to find out whether the novel avian influenza virus possesses the capability to transmit person-to-person. She concludes that "the infection of the daughter is likely to have resulted from her father during unprotected exposure" and suggest that the virus possesses the ability to transmit person-to-person in this cluster. She does add however that the infection was "limited and non-sustainable as there is no outbreak following the two cases."
    __________________________________________
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  5. #25
    Distinguished Community Member Abby2006's Avatar
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    [B]Heads up folks

    Abby

    Creating A Super Flu Virus: Scientists Set Course For Controversial H7N9 Influenza Experiments
    By Nsikan Akpan | Aug 7, 2013 01:18 PM EDT


    Infectious particles of the avian H7N9 virus emerge from a cell. Researchers announce plans that may create a more dangerous version of the H7N9 influenza virus... and why that's not necessarily a bad idea. Two letters published in the journals Nature and Science argue for the commencement of research on the H7N9 influenza that may yield more potent strains of the new flu virus that emerged in China earlier this year.

    Follow Us To fully assess the potential risk associated with these novel viruses, there is a need for additional research including experiments that may be classified as "gain-of-function," wrote virologist Ron Fuchier of Erasmus Medical Center (Netherlands) and 21 other world-renowned scientists.

    H7N9 avian influenza jumped from poultry to humans this past spring, causing an international scare, although the virus only infected 134 people in east Asia. The virus' spread was limited by its inability to easily pass between people. Indeed, the only suspected example of person-to-person transmission occurred between two Asian family members in March, although the details of the case weren't released until this week. Both individuals were killed by the virus.

    Read more: Transmission Of H7N9 Bird Flu From Human To Human 'Probable'

    Scientists are worried, with enough time, that H7N9 could evolve into a more vicious spreader. Given the virus's mortality rate hovers at about 30 percent, such a development could trigger a severe epidemic.

    Drug resistance against current antivirals has also reared its ugly head in the H7N9 storyline, which has the National Institutes of Health, scientists in China, and multiple drug firms working day and night to find better treatments.

    Drug resistance is one area that the authors of these letters want to examine, along with investigations into building vaccines, adaptation, transmission, and disease severity — all of which may produce more dangerous variants of H7N9.

    The correspondence, according to the authors, is intended to preempt the backlash that is expected from the regular citizens and fellow scientists that think this line of research is an unnecessary risk.

    Are the right safety protocols in place?

    What if experimental H7N9 virus particles capable of causing a serious epideimic are accidentally released from one these labs?

    Fouchier is no stranger to such rebuffs. He headed one of two labs that surprised the world in 2011 when they announced the creation of an H5N1 avian influenza strain that could easily pass between mammals (ferrets). This set off a series of global protests in the media and academic circles that halted similar projects on H5N1 for over a year.

    Yet this ban, which was self-imposed by global virologists, was lifted after government agencies and international health organizations spent thousands of hours dicussing the dangers.

    These letters will arguably serve as an initiating platform for debate, and indeed, scientists are already sounding off, with some calling the authors justification "very flimsy, to put it mildly."

    In response to the letters, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has issued guidelines on how it will proceed with the approval of H7N9 gain-of-function research to ensure the appropriate biosafety practices are maintained.

    Sources: Fouchier RAM, Kawaoka Y, Cardona C, et al. Gain-of-Function Experiments on H7N9. Science. 2013.
    Last edited by Moderator #7; 08-24-2013 at 08:01 PM. Reason: Non-working link.
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  6. #26
    Distinguished Community Member Abby2006's Avatar
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    This is interesting

    Health Map

    http://healthmap.org/about/

    Abby
    Stand for something or you will fall for anything

  7. #27
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    New Chinese Bird Flu May Be Worse Than H7N9 Virus
    By Cassie Ryan, Epoch Times | August 23, 2013
    Last Updated: August 23, 2013 11:52 pminShare.

    http://www.theepochtimes.com/n3/2599...an-h7n9-virus/

    A man weighs a chicken in a Hong Kong poultry market on May 24, 2013. Another bird flu virus has been found in chickens in China, that appears to have been developing alongside the H7N9 strain. (Philippe Lopez/AFP/Getty Images)



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    •A virus called H7N7 has been discovered in chickens in China, according to a new study published in the journal Nature.

    A team of Hong Kong researchers found the virus in about 25 percent of the fowl sampled, many of which also had the H7N9 virus. By testing the H7N7 virus on ferrets, the researchers found that it can be transmitted to mammals.

    “If (we) let this H7N7 continue circulating in chickens, I am sure that human infection cases will occur,” study co-author Guan Yi at the University of Hong Kong told AFP. “This virus could cause more severe infection than … H7N9, based on our animal experiment.”

    H7N7 appears to have developed alongside H7N9, which has killed 44 of more than 130 people infected in China.

    “We think it is scary for humans,” Guan added. “Our entire human population almost has no antibodies against the H7 subtype of influenza virus. Thus, if it causes pandemic outbreak, it will kill many people.”

    The scientists believe a better surveillance system is needed to monitor for dangerous viruses like H7N9 that may be emerging. “This is a very different influenza ecosystem from other countries,” Guan said, according to Nature.
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  8. #28
    Distinguished Community Member SalpalSally's Avatar
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    Abby, please stop posting these reports. They are not supportive
    and are scaring the crowd.

    Thank you
    Last edited by SalpalSally; 08-24-2013 at 06:20 PM.
    Love, Sally


    "The best way out is always through". Robert Frost







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