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Thread: NEW Bird Flu

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    Distinguished Community Member Abby2006's Avatar
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    Distinguished Community Member agate's Avatar
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    This new bird flu was on the national TV news tonight.
    MS diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2002-2005. Copaxone 6/07 - 5/10.
    Member of this MS board since 2001.

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    Distinguished Community Member Abby2006's Avatar
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    I am not going to rehash this from 2006/07 just wamted you guys to be aware and take precautions like carrying mask and staying away from crowds[, I know alot of people that are sick right now said its like the flu they had this winter back tracked and thus felt worse - one was a neighbor (nurse( we talked by phone and she said she had been home so far 5 days from work

    Abby


    Scientists race to gauge pandemic risk of new bird flu

    http://news.yahoo.com/scientists-rac...140550033.html



    LONDON (Reuters) - Genetic sequence data on a deadly strain of bird flu previously unknown in people show the virus has already acquired some mutations that might make it more likely to cause a human pandemic, scientists say.

    But there is no evidence so far that the H7N9 flu - now known to have infected nine people in China, killing three - is spreading from person to person, and there is still a chance it might peter out and never fully mutate into a human form of flu.

    Just days after authorities in China announced they had identified cases of H7N9, flu experts in laboratories across the world are picking through the DNA sequence data of samples isolated from the patients to assess its pandemic potential.

    One of the world's top flu experts, Ab Osterhaus, who is based at the Erasmus Medical Center in The Netherlands, says the sequences show some genetic mutations that should put authorities on alert and entail increased surveillance in animals and humans.

    "The virus has to a certain extent already adapted to mammalian species and to humans, so from that point of view it's worrisome," he told Reuters in a telephone interview.

    "Really we should keep a very close eye on this."

    China's National Health and Family Planning Commission confirmed on Sunday that three people had been infected with the new H7N9 flu, with two deaths of men in Shanghai aged 87 and 27 who fell sick in late February. Chinese authorities have in the past two days confirmed another six cases, including another fatal one.

    The World Health Organization (WHO) says the cases of H7N9 are "of concern" because they are the first in humans.

    "That makes it a unique event, which the World Health Organization is taking seriously," the Geneva-based United Nations health agency said on Wednesday.

    Other strains of bird flu, such as H5N1, have been circulating for many years and can be transmitted from bird to bird, and bird to human, but not from human to human.

    So far, this lack of human-to-human transmission also appears to be a feature of the H7N9 strain.

    Flu viruses are classified based on two types of protein found on their surface, hemagglutinin and neuraminidase, which are abbreviated to H and N.

    Although it is very early days, scientists says initial analysis also suggests H7N9 does not appear to make birds particularly ill - in other words it is what is known as a low pathogenic avian influenza, of LPAI.

    Unfortunately, this doesn't necessarily mean it will be mild in humans, says Wendy Barclay, a flu virology expert at Britain's Imperial College London.

    FINDING THE SOURCE

    "We can't be complacent. We have to be cautious," she said, stressing that other H5 and H7 flu subtypes have been able to mutate from LPAI to the more dangerous highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) as they circulate in various hosts, particularly in chickens.

    Its mildness in birds could also mean H7N9 is a "silent spreader" - harder to detect than highly pathogenic flu strains such as H5N1 that can wipe out entire flocks of wild birds or domestic poultry and are therefore far more visible.

    "It's a sort of double-edged sword, because if and when it becomes highly pathogenic and all the chickens start dying, that's very bad for the poultry farmers, but it means we can see much more easily where the virus is," Barclay said.

    "At the moment, we can't see where this virus is coming from. We don't know yet what animal source is feeding this."

    Finding that source, and tracking the genetic mutations to see if, how and when this new strain might gain the ability to spark a human pandemic are now the priorities for researchers in China and around the world, Barclay and Osterhaus said.

    The WHO praised the Chinese government, saying it was responding to the situation with various important measures such as enhanced surveillance, detailed case management and treatment, tracing contacts of all those known to have been infected so far, and training healthcare professionals.

    Experts said the fact that H7N9 had been identified and swiftly reported, and that genetic sequence data was already available for researchers around the world to analyze, was a sign of how things have changed.

    In 2003, China initially tried to cover up an epidemic of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, which emerged in China and killed about a tenth of the 8,000 people it infected worldwide.

    Ian Jones, a professor of virology at Britain's University of Reading, said the heightened awareness of flu and of the possibility that unusual respiratory diseases may turn out to be new strains of flu means more cases get referred to hospitals.

    "It's quite possible these cases ... are being detected because flu is way up there" on disease priority lists, he said.

    (Editing by Ben Hirschler and Will Waterman)

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    Distinguished Community Member Abby2006's Avatar
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    .Could new bird flu strain spread across the globe?

    Fox News

    http://news.yahoo.com/video/could-bi...201013928.html
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    Oh great.
    I heard about this one.

    Just let me check out fast after a very good meal.

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    Distinguished Community Member Abby2006's Avatar
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    Don't panic over new bird flu outbreak, CDC cautionsBy JoNel Aleccia, Senior Writer, NBC News

    http://vitals.nbcnews.com/_news/2013...-cautions?lite


    A deadly outbreak of a new kind of bird flu has now sickened 16 people in China and killed six, but U.S. health officials on Friday cautioned that there’s no cause for widespread alarm.

    The new influenza A H7N9 virus has not been seen before in humans, but it doesn’t appear to be transmitted easily among people, and there have been no cases detected in the United States, said Dr. Tom Frieden, the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    “There are no specific steps people in this country can take. People can go about their daily lives,” he said.

    Still, he said CDC officials are in close contact with Chinese authorities as they track the spread of the novel virus, which has been found in people from four Chinese provinces.

    Advertise | AdChoicesVictims have included 15 adults and a 4-year-old child, all of whom appeared to have clear ties to live poultry markets. They all became ill between Feb. 19 and March 31. Two of the 16 had other people in their families fall ill, but whether it was related is still being assessed.

    “At this point, there are several things that give us confidence that this is not spreading widely from person to person,” Frieden said.

    For example, Chinese authorities have tracked 100 close contacts of people who got sick, and none of them became ill. With typical influenza, perhaps 20 percent to 30 percent of family members could be expected to develop the flu, Frieden said.

    CDC is working with vaccine manufacturers to develop a seed strain to produce a vaccine to protect against the H7N9 virus, but that would only occur if there appeared to be widespread transmission. If that were necessary, it would not disrupt production of the seasonal vaccine, CDC officials said.

    The agency issued a health alert for U.S. clinicians urging them to be alert for recent travelers from China who could show signs of the novel flu. CDC is also developing a diagnostic test that could quickly detect the virus.

    No travel advisories have been issued, but CDC officials are reminding U.S. tourists in China to stay away from live poultry markets. That's the same advice the agency has issued for about a decade, since outbreaks of SARS and H5N1 flu. The World Health Organization said it was not advising screening at points of entry or any trade restrictions in connection with the outbreak.

    China's neighboring countries are closely monitoring people for signs of flu. A 7-year-old girl in Hong Kong was being tested Friday in a local hospital for signs of the virus, according to the official Chinese news outlet Xinhua. Tougher surveillance also has started in Laos, Cambodia, Thailand and Taiwan, CDC officials said.

    Though no source of the outbreak has been identified, Chinese officials have detected the virus in chickens and in pigeons and are now culling flocks to prevent further spread of the virus.

    Health officials can't yet say whether this virus is especially virulent. Wider population tests will need to be conducted to tell whether many people may have become infected with virus without becoming seriously ill, or whether those who got infected developed severe illness.

    The virus appears to be common in animals, where it causes only mild illness. Doctors closely monitor cases of animal flu that pass into humans. Seasonal flu kills tens of thousands of people globally every year. But a new virus that starts passing from animals to people could cause far more serious disease.

    For instance, H5N1 bird flu kills about 60 percent of the people it infects. But it doesn't pass easily among people, either, and most of those who've gotten appeared to be directly infected by sick chickens.

    Still, Frieden noted that flu can mutate very quickly and there's no way to tell whether this new virus will soon become more transmissible. The H1N1 swine flu in 2009 didn't cause serious illness, but it spread very quickly. And that bug was a descendant of the 1918 "Spanish flu," which killed between 50 million and 100 million people worldwide.
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    Flu Prevention Video

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dl7npMRkF_w

    Abby
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    Never mind until I read the whole thing
    Abby
    Last edited by Abby2006; 04-29-2013 at 08:58 AM.
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    New SARS-Like Coronavirus Suspected at New York Hospital



    LONG BEACH, CA -- (Marketwired) -- 05/18/13 -- AvianFluTalk.com, an online discussion forum created in 2005 to track the potential threat of an avian flu pandemic, has been the venue for a serious discussion regarding the new SARS-like coronavirus infecting patients at a New York Hospital leaving several in critical condition and resulting in 3 deaths.

    The new SARS-like coronavirus recently emerged in the Middle East infecting 41 total worldwide resulting in 20 deaths and is primarily spread by limited human-to-human transmission. Experts fear that the virus' early ability to transmit among humans could spark a global pandemic should the virus mutate further and achieve sustained human transmission.

    Nurses working at a St. Luke's hospital in New York have claimed that there are several cases of the new SARS-like virus in the hospital's ICU, which have gone misdiagnosed and that are in fact the new deadly virus.

    A nurse who works at the hospital believes there is a potential outbreak of this new SARS-like virus and she too has now been hospitalized with flu-like symptoms. Although hospital administrators have made no comment about this matter, posters on the online message board at avianflutalk.com have indicated through research that it is influenza B. The nurses are disputing that claim stating that in fact the new coronavirus is the culprit.
    The nurses feel that they have an obligation to speak-out about their suspicions in this matter.

    http://finance.nrn.com/nrn/news/read?GUID=24223571
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