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Thread: Stress management program results in fewer lesions?

  1. #1
    Distinguished Community Member agate's Avatar
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    Default Stress management program results in fewer lesions?

    An article in the Chicago Tribune (October 10) concerns a Northwestern University study of 121 MS patients and a stress management therapy program. The study subjects on the stress management program seem to have developed fewer new lesions while they were on the program.

    The abstract for this study states:

    This study provides Class I evidence that SMT-MS, a manualized stress management therapy program, reduced the number of Gd+ lesions in patients with MS during a 24-week treatment period. This benefit was not sustained beyond 24 weeks, and there were no clinical benefits.
    I have no idea how significant this study is, but thought some people might be interested.
    MS diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2002-2005. Copaxone 6/07 - 5/10.
    Member of this MS board since 2001.

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    Distinguished Community Member SalpalSally's Avatar
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    Lots scoffed at my statement here at BT, years ago. that one day they would discover that stress not only causes MS exacerbations but may even be a cause of MS.
    Love, Sally


    "The best way out is always through". Robert Frost







  3. #3
    Distinguished Community Member renee's Avatar
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    I believe it.

    Since my first disastrous exascerbation 16 years ago, i have maintained a distance
    or involved assistance in brick wall conflicts and unrelenting contact with poisonous people.

    Fact and good reason doesn't always get you what you need or deserve-
    introducing stress management programs will save many from illness.

    I wish I had help 6 months before the exascerbation.
    I am certain I would not have landed so quickly in a wheelchair as a para.

    Mental health assistance for all and for all a good night.

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    Distinguished Community Member Frog42's Avatar
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    Whatever happens around you, don't take it personally. Nothing other people do is because of you. It is because of themselves. -- Miguel Ruiz

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    Definately Stress contributes to MS!

    Gabriella
    Progressive/Relapsing MS, Myasthenia Gravis, Spinal Stenosis, Degenerative Disc Disease, Diabetes, Hypertension, Hashimoto's Thyroiditis
    Advocate for ADA, Artist's Community for Change, ADAPT, Universal Living in Place, HopeKeepers, Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    "Life is mostly froth and bubble, two things stand like stone. Kindness in another's trouble, Courage in your own"........Adam Lindsay Gordon

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    I have no doubt that it is a contributing factor, but I do doubt that it actually causes it.
    Virginia

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    Default Continuing Stress

    I do believe and can attest that continuing stress has caused the exacerbation to continue as I haven't had these symptoms for this long ever before. I hope I can get some relief this week but it doesn't look promising.

    The nurse at the MS Center called me on Friday to tell me they have to start the process all over again as someone just quit working on it last year. They have to get approval from my insurances and send a Questor nurse out to the house to explain the injection technique.

    I just took that last of the hydrocodone 5/500 tonight and need to call the center tomorrow as no refills are indicated on these pills. I think I am going to try and get something else for the "MonSter Hug". It still has me in it's grasp. The symptoms are the very same as a heart attack...shortness of breath....tightness around the ribs.....numbness and tingling in the back. The only symptom I don't have is pain which is why the doctor seemed to think it is the "hug". I saw the pulmonoligist again last week and he doesn't think it is asthma. I do have a leaky heart valve and don't know if these symptoms could be caused by that.

    It's very hard to know what to do....but I did talk to my doctor a week ago and he told me if I did start having any chest pains to go to the nearest emergency room. It's been going on for almost 2 1/2 weeks so it is very stressful to say the least. One must have "nerves of steel" with this darn disease and .....as you all know.... unfortunately it is our nerves that are damaged.

    My husband is also adding to the stress as he continues to get worse without any answers and not knowing for certain what is his prognosis is the worse feeling.

    Sorry just a little "pity party" but......Tomorrow is another day....as Scarlett would say!

    Gabriella
    Progressive/Relapsing MS, Myasthenia Gravis, Spinal Stenosis, Degenerative Disc Disease, Diabetes, Hypertension, Hashimoto's Thyroiditis
    Advocate for ADA, Artist's Community for Change, ADAPT, Universal Living in Place, HopeKeepers, Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    "Life is mostly froth and bubble, two things stand like stone. Kindness in another's trouble, Courage in your own"........Adam Lindsay Gordon

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    Distinguished Community Member agate's Avatar
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    There's the question about what stress is. Obviously having a partner who has severe health problems is stressful in a big way. Then there are the usual stressors--divorce or separation, fire or other natural disaster, death in the family, job loss or unemployment, financial hardship, frequent moves--the list goes on and on.

    Heat is considered to be a stressor too, and I can understand why.
    MS diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2002-2005. Copaxone 6/07 - 5/10.
    Member of this MS board since 2001.

  9. #9
    Distinguished Community Member SalpalSally's Avatar
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    Yes Agate, there are mental stresses, such as you mention and don't forget the physical stresses, such as an operation, a fall, an infection, the flu...etc...






    ..
    Last edited by SalpalSally; 10-22-2012 at 10:46 AM.
    Love, Sally


    "The best way out is always through". Robert Frost







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    I think as many of us have, I have known all of these stressors at one time or another, sometime more than one at the time. For me personally, what Gabriella is going through with her husband was I guess the worse. Thank God my MS was in remission at the time and I did not even know I had it. If I had been dealing with what I am now plus trying to care for him there just would not have been a way I could have held out. I have always been very grateful that my own health held up during that time, but then I was only 49 and now I am much older.
    Virginia

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