Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: Iodinated Contrast Media in Imaging Procedures Appears to Affect Thyroid Function

  1. #1
    Distinguished Community Member Beachgirl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Gold Coast, Australia
    Posts
    129

    Default Iodinated Contrast Media in Imaging Procedures Appears to Affect Thyroid Function

    Use of Iodinated Contrast Media in Imaging Procedures Appears to Affect Thyroid Function


    ScienceDaily (Jan. 23, 2012) Exposure to iodinated contrast media during imaging procedures is associated with changes in thyroid function, and increased risk of developing hyperthyroidism, according to a report in the January 23 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------


    "Iodinated contrast media (ICM) are commonly administered pharmaceutical agents," the authors write as background information. ICM are frequently used in scans and imaging procedures such as cardiac catheterization and computed tomography (CT scans). "Although certain complications of ICM (e.g., contrast-induced nephropathy) have been extensively studied, there has been little examination of the effect of ICM on thyroid function."

    Connie M. Rhee, M.D., and colleagues from Brigham and Women's Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, examined data from patients treated between January 1990 and June 2010 who did not have preexisting hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism. Patients were matched with euthyroid (normal thyroid function) controls, and exposure to iodinated contrast media was assessed using claims data.

    A total of 178 patients with incident hyperthyroidism and 213 patients with incident hypothyroidism were matched to 655 and 779 euthyroid persons, respectively. The authors found that iodinated contrast media exposure was associated with incident hyperthyroidism, but no statistically significant association was found with incident hypothyroidism.

    Secondary analysis indicated an association between iodinated contrast media exposure and incident overt (clinical; diagnosed based on characteristic clinical features) hypothyrodism and incident overt (clinical) hyperthyroidism.

    "In summary, these data support association between ICM exposure and incident hyperthyroidism, incident overt hyperthyroidism and incident overt hypothyroidism," the authors conclude. "Given the pervasive use of ICM in contemporary practice and the known sequelae of thyroid functional derangements, further studies are needed to confirm and evaluate generalizability of these findings, to establish causality and to explore mechanisms."

    Invited Commentary: Iodine-Induced Thyroid Dysfunction

    In an accompanying invited commentary, Elizabeth N. Pearce, M.D., M.Sc., of Boston University School of Medicine writes that Rhee et al "describe significant associations between contrast exposure and the development of hyperthyroidism. While no overall association exists between contrast exposure and all forms of hypothyroidism, an association was noted when cases were restricted to those with overt hypothyroidism."

    "These data represent an important contribution to our knowledge about a clinically relevant and understudied area," Dr. Pearce writes. "Rhee et al have demonstrated that a relatively large proportion of individuals who developed iodine-induced thyroid dysfunction were not known to have underlying risk factors. Therefore, patients who may be particularly unable to tolerate thyroid dysfunction, such as those with underlying unstable cardiovascular disease, are also good candidates for monitoring of thyroid function after iodine exposure."




    Story Source:


    The above story is reprinted from materials provided by JAMA and Archives Journals.

    Note: Materials may be edited for content and length. For further information, please contact the source cited above.


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Journal References:
    1.C. M. Rhee, I. Bhan, E. K. Alexander, S. M. Brunelli. Association Between Iodinated Contrast Media Exposure and Incident Hyperthyroidism and Hypothyroidism. Archives of Internal Medicine, 2012; 172 (2): 153 DOI: 10.1001/archinternmed.2011.677
    2.E. N. Pearce. Iodine-Induced Thyroid Dysfunction: Comment on "Association Between Iodinated Contrast Media Exposure and Incident Hyperthyroidism and Hypothyroidism". Archives of Internal Medicine, 2012; 172 (2): 159 DOI: 10.1001/archinternmed.2011.1396
    To see a world in a grain of sand,
    And a heaven in a wild flower,
    Hold infinity in the palm of your hand,
    And eternity in an hour. - William Blake.

  2. #2
    Distinguished Community Member Ging's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    288

    Default

    Nat, the iodine is bad for me, lost so much hair and the pain, when it hit my head was a nightmare :( thanks for posting this, I go on March 8th for my angio, yikes !!!

  3. #3

    Default

    Thanks for posting this, Nat. There are several types of contrast available for CT scans. I have found that if I call ahead and speak with the radiology department about my fears related to contrast, I can avoid the contrast which contains iodine. Most Radiology departments use the contrast recommended by the CT machine maker, but if you were allergic to iodine or shellfish another contrast would be found.

    Hope all is well with everyone here!
    JulieNH

  4. #4
    Distinguished Community Member Beachgirl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Gold Coast, Australia
    Posts
    129

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JulieNH View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    Thanks for posting this, Nat. There are several types of contrast available for CT scans. I have found that if I call ahead and speak with the radiology department about my fears related to contrast, I can avoid the contrast which contains iodine. Most Radiology departments use the contrast recommended by the CT machine maker, but if you were allergic to iodine or shellfish another contrast would be found.

    Hope all is well with everyone here!
    JulieNH
    Hey Julie!

    Yes, this is very true and a very good point!

    Well, I'm great down here in Australia! How are you doing? You have had some challenges lately - I hope you are doing ok. xx
    To see a world in a grain of sand,
    And a heaven in a wild flower,
    Hold infinity in the palm of your hand,
    And eternity in an hour. - William Blake.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 01-11-2012, 04:28 PM
  2. Chronic Progressive Illness, Not Always as It Appears
    By NeuroNixed Craig in forum Multiple Sclerosis
    Replies: 78
    Last Post: 12-14-2011, 11:31 AM
  3. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 10-20-2011, 07:30 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


BTC Inc's Disclaimer and Privacy Policy

The material on this site is for information & support purposes only, and is not a substitute for medical advice provided by a licensed health care provider. Always consult your doctor before trying anything that you find online.