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Thread: COVID-19 thread

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Earth Mother 2 Angels View Post
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    ((((((Hugs to All)))))) ~

    agate ~

    It's sad that your manager isn't more concerned about the well being, safety and health of the residents in her building. It's unfortunate that COVID might cause her some extra work to protect the residents from getting the virus through vaccination. This is her Job, for which she is paid. It's not like the residents created this extra work for her. It goes with the territory of her job during a pandemic.

    As you said, you have rules about social distancing. I suspect that all of the residents are vulnerable, and having to go out to a CVS or somewhere may put the residents at risk. Some residents may not be able to go out, such as those, who are home-bound. And, some may be like you, who have to depend upon transit to get you to/from a vaccine location. That is a lot for you to go through, every time you do it, by all of your accounts, even when it goes "well."

    If the objective is to vaccinate people, who are in long-term care facilities, then it should also include the residents of your community, who live independently, but need assistance to be independent.

    It seems as if there isn't anything you, or any of the residents, can do to persuade your manager to assist you to ensure that you're vaccinated. I'm truly sorry that you all have to deal with this.

    funnylegs4 ~

    I hope the vaccines do prevent COVID, of course. My concern is that there are differing expert opinions on whether they do.

    With Jonathan and Michael, I've "worked with" many infectious disease specialists, and I've always found them to be the most diligent researchers and detectives in treating my sons. So, I'm inclined to believe Dr. Fauci.

    Given the substantial amount of disinformation and misinformation we've received since COVID was first announced to us in March 2019, I am cautious with government officials advising us on COVID.

    I agree with you that people are confused. I'm one of them. I know the difference between RNA and DNA, as I'm sure the medical experts do. But, we've been fed so much garbage since this began, it's natural for people to be confused. Unless someone has had extensive experience with health and medical issues, as all of us have, it's all Greek.

    It's good to hear that your friend is recovering, and as I said to Virginia, her pre-existing conditions may contribute to lingering fatigue and flare ups. My prayers for her complete healing continue.

    Virginia ~

    It's ambitious of your SIL and brother to go out, and to shop for you after all that they've been through. I hope they take it easy though, because it's quite clear that COVID is horrible, and side effects can continue for awhile.

    Thank you for reminding us of how important it is for us to keep wearing our masks, washing our hands, and social distancing. There is no such thing as "being too safe."

    Prayers, healing, positive energy to all ~

    Love & Light,



    Rose

    *Virtual Hugs Are Germ-Free!
    Thanks Rose! Apparently one of her conditions effects her immune system so that might explain how her body is responding. She's able to email and text with us to update us so that is good.
    Technically speaking what any vaccine does is get the immune system to recognize a virus when it gets in you and destroy it. In the case of COVID19 vaccine from my readings the vaccine causes the body to make a neutral copy of the spike protein, then if you get COVID19 for real white blood cells attack it and destroy it too quickly for it to cause illness. Flu vaccine works the same way, so you can still "get" a virus after a vaccination but vaccination prevents illness. I think...
    Mild Spastic Diplegia Cerebral Palsy and bad proprioception.
    My website for my original short films! http://cripvideoproductions.com/astrokeofendurance.php

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  3. #22
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    I got a telephone call a few days ago about making an appointment to take the vaccine. I turned it down only because the lady calling me couldn't tell me exactly where it was located. I had to know that I would be able to walk into wherever it was and I would also need to know that I would not have to stand in a line. She gave me a number to call.

    I called the number today and waited on hold between 45min to an hour, only to find out it was the same place that had called me. The lady who called me did not put me down for a time and date (in order to hold it) I was told, so now they have to put me on a wait list because there are no openings.

    I was disappointed that I would not be getting the vaccine right now. There is one thing that concerns me. I want to know that they will have the 2nd dose before I take the first because I don't want the first if I can't get the second on schedule.
    Virginia

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  5. #23
    Distinguished Community Member agate's Avatar
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    And today I was at the lab that is in a huge building that is part of a vast medical complex, one of two or three major players on the medical care scene hereabouts, and I asked if they'd be giving the COVID-19 vaccine.

    The lab people shrugged and said that some of the doctors "might" be giving it. So I'll check with my doctor, who is in the same building. I could have dropped in there today and asked but I'm going to be doing a phone visit with the doctor soon and I'll ask at that time.

    I went to this CDC Website where you can look up the information for your state, and according to that, I'll be eligible to get the vaccine by February 8. They're administering it in phases according to whether you're working in high-risk jobs or living in facilities like nursing homes, and according to age.

    https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019...nes/index.html
    MS, diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2001-2004. Copaxone 2006-2009.

    "Always put off until tomorrow whatever you think you should do today." --Anonymous



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  7. #24
    Distinguished Community Member Earth Mother 2 Angels's Avatar
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    ((((((Hugs to All)))))) ~

    Today, I encountered two more reputable sources, a physician and AARP, stating that the COVID vaccines do not prevent contracting the virus.


    Dr. Jennifer Ashton, who is a consultant on the ABC TV network, stated this morning on Good Morning America that after receiving both doses of the COVID vaccines, people will still be able to get COVID. She said that the vaccines do not prevent COVID, but they will help to reduce the severity of symptoms.


    AARP Bulletin, January-February 2021 issue’s Cover Story is “How We Will Beat COVID.”

    “Everyone —vaccinated or not—will need to continue all current recommendations regarding social distancing, wearing a mask and avoiding travel. This is because up to 10 percent of vaccinated individuals will not be protected from getting COVID19 and because reinfection, while uncommon, can still occur.

    And the vaccine itself doesn’t prevent you from contracting the virus; it simply prepares your body to mount a vigorous defense so that if you do become infected, the resulting illness is far less likely to be life-threatening.”
    https://press.aarp.org/2021-1-5-AARP...p-Defeat-COVID

    MORE AARP TIPS:

    Masks: AARP says that medical surgical masks and multi-layered cloth masks are best in protecting transmission of the virus, while single layer cloth masks and plastic face shields provide less protection, and gaiters and bandanas/scarves offer the least effective protection.

    Disposable Gloves: “Viruses stick to gloves as well as skin, so if you’re not careful to swipe them out repeatedly, you may actually be increasing your risk.”

    I wear gloves for everything I do, and I change my gloves after doing one thing and before doing something else.

    When I was going out in the world (which I have curtailed as the surge goes unfettered), I carried gloves with me in the van and my purse. I put gloves on before I'd go into a building and remove them when I came out, before I returned to the van. When in the hospital or medical setting with my boys or Jim, I changed my gloves continuously, as well as washed my hands.

    John was stunned at how many gloves I used as he transported me around. Fresh gloves when I got into his car, which I changed when I got out.

    Gloves can also serve as a deterrent to touch your face. For me, they are a reminder that I’m in a germy place.

    When I didn’t have gloves, I had (still do) alcohol swabs, which I used to wipe my hands (before sanitizers became a thing).

    Sanitizing Packages: According to AARP, "Surfaces are less of a mechanism for transmission of the virus than we thought at first. If you receive a package or haul in a load of groceries, simply unpack and then wash your hands.”

    I don’t know the science behind this change in what “we thought at first.” Nonetheless, I will continue to wipe down my groceries with isopropyl alcohol or now Lysol wipes, before I put them away. I’ve been doing this for the last 13 years, and I don’t intend to stop now.

    I just think about the number of people, who have handled that product or produce, and I go right to cleaning it.

    And if germs don’t remain on surfaces, then why do hospitals use disinfectants in every room? And why does every room have to be thoroughly disinfected before another patient can use that room?

    Also, if there are no virus germs on my groceries, then why do I need to wash my hands after I unload and put them away?

    I know one germ that does remain on surfaces: MRSA.

    So, once again, we are left with the question of whether the COVID vaccines prevent infection or just reduce the severity of symptoms. Of course, the latter is not a bad choice. It’s just less hopeful than the idea that the vaccine will prevent getting it.

    I’m just a reporter searching for the facts. I can’t explain the contradictions among the facts. My concern is for all of us battling this pandemic being well informed, so that we can be safe and well.

    Love & Light,



    Rose

    *Virtual Hugs Are Germ-Free!
    Last edited by Earth Mother 2 Angels; 01-15-2021 at 04:54 PM.
    Mom to Jon, 49, and Michael, 32, who were born with an undiagnosed progressive neuromuscular disease and courageous spirits. Our Angel Michael received his wings in 2003. Our Angel Jon received his wings April 2019. April 2020, Jim, the world's most wonderful Dad, joined them. Now, they all watch over me.

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  9. #25
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    Even if the vaccine just prevents the severity of the disease and prevents you from dying, that is enough for me. After what I am seeing with my brother, I just do not want to get it if I can possibly prevent it.

    Thanks for the information Rose.
    Virginia

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  11. #26
    Distinguished Community Member Howie's Avatar
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    What I've been wondering is, how does the virus affect someone who doesn't take an MS drug? Has anyone heard of someone who has MS (like me), but takes no MS drug (like me), and still has their revved up immune system intact (like me), getting COVID virus?
    "Given the millions of billions of Earth-like planets, life elsewhere in the Universe without a doubt, does exist."

    Albert Einstein

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  13. #27
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    “The vaccines are safe to use with MS medications
    Continue your disease modifying therapy (DMT) unless you are advised by your MS healthcare provider to stop or delay it. Stopping some DMTs abruptly can cause severe increase in disability with new lesions on MRI. Based on data from previous studies of other vaccines and DMTs, getting the COVID-19 vaccine while on any DMT is safe. Some DMTs may make the vaccine less effective but it will still provide some protection. For those taking Kesimpta, Lemtrada, Mavenclad, Ocrevus, or Rituxan—you may need to coordinate the timing of your vaccine with the timing of your DMT dose. Work with your MS healthcare provider to determine the best schedule for you. We are in the process of developing considerations for providers to use when making these decisions “

    This quote is from the National Multiple Sclerosis Society website.

    My neuro , based upon a different website that pertains to IVIG and also chemo for cancer patients, rec to me to have IVIG, wait two weeks for the vaccine, then wait two more weeks for the next IVIG, thus missing a Session of IVIG. Same for the second COVID shot.

    Here is that second website:
    https://www.asco.org/asco-coronaviru...atients-cancer

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  15. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Howie View Post
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    What I've been wondering is, how does the virus affect someone who doesn't take an MS drug? Has anyone heard of someone who has MS (like me), but takes no MS drug (like me), and still has their revved up immune system intact (like me), getting COVID virus?
    The CDC has established a list of conditions that may put one at increased risk for a worse experience. This includes cancer, COPD, diabetes, high blood pressure, to name only a few:

    https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019...onditions.html

    Then again, there are many perfectly healthy people, many of them young, with no underlying conditions, who have died from coronavirus.

    If you get it, there's just no way to determine how you will fare. The older you are, the more at risk you are, that much is definitely known. And since you, too, have had no prior exposure to this cov19 virus, your immune system has not developed any antibodies with which to fight it - you are in the same boat as everyone else.
    Last edited by SuzE-Q; 01-16-2021 at 06:21 AM.

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  17. #29
    Distinguished Community Member SuzE-Q's Avatar
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    Howie, if I could just add,

    If your theory is that you have a 'revved up' immune system, you may be at increased risk for a worse outcome if you contracted covid.

    That is one of the theories about why some young people appear to be hard hit: they have a very strong immune reaction that results in a cytokine explosion that overwhelms any balance, and they appear to crash from an excessive inflammatory reaction.

    Their immune system did too good a job, to their detriment.

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  19. #30
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    Rose, I talked with my brother this afternoon and before I could even bring up the O2, he brought it up. He said he was having trouble breathing at night and that he doesn't know if it is anxiety or still the effects of COVID. He has a long way to go to get over this. He did go out with his wife to have breakfast yesterday. They met some close friends. Also, Thursday evening he met one of his Granddaughters and her Mother for dinner.

    He said he wishes he had not given up his O2 tank, but the one he had was big and took up room and he said it was very noisy. At the time he had it he was still going down to the beach with some of his buddies to play a little golf and he had to drag that big tank along. Now, they have smaller, much quieter ones, but he is not sure he can get one because O2 is in short supply. He said he doesn't want to take one away from someone who needs it worse than he does. I can't remember what he said his O2 level was last night, but I noticed it was down when he told me. I did tell him all the things you said.
    Virginia

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