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Thread: Autoimmune Disorders/Immunosuppresion and COVID Vaccines

  1. #11
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    Linda, as far as what phase to put people in, my doctor was going off the Massachusetts COVID-19 website. So if you have MS and are also a health care worker, you would be in Phase I with all the other health care workers. That starts December 21. My doctor's office will not be giving shots, and he did not recommend where to get them.

    I think our snow storm will hit Wednesday night through Thursday, and we should get about a foot where I am on the coast. Best to you if you have to go out.
    Last edited by Ikoiko; 12-15-2020 at 12:11 PM.

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  3. #12
    Distinguished Community Member SuzE-Q's Avatar
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    I like the recent BART's analysis of this, I've been following along with their posts about this over the past few months:

    Anti-CD20 therapies

    When I initially wrote about vaccine hesitancy I suggested that pwMS on an anti-CD20 therapy (rituximab, ocrelizumab, ofatumumab) may have to delay their next infusion or miss one or two infusions to allow B-cell reconstitution before they have a coronavirus vaccine. Since making this statement more immunological data has emerged and there really is no definitive evidence to support this position.

    Yes, I agree that in general people on anti-CD20 therapies have blunted antibody responses to wild-type SARS-CoV-2 infection and to other vaccines including vaccines with containing new antigens that the immune system has not seen before. However, this doesnít mean these people havenít developed immunity to the infection or vaccine that is long-lasting. For one the vast majority of pwMS on an anti-CD20 therapy who get COVID-19 make an uneventful recovery. Why? Almost certainly this recovery is due to cellular and not humoral (antibody) immunity and this immunity wonít vanish and is likely to persist longterm.
    The only evidence base we have at the moment is the recently published VELOCE study that delayed vaccination until 4 weeks after an initial course of ocrelizumab. This study showed blunted, but not absent, antibody responses to recall and new vaccines. Based on this study if you have just had a recent course of ocrelizumab you may want to delay getting the COVID-19 vaccine until for 4 weeks after the last infusion.
    https://multiple-sclerosis-research....id19-catch-22/

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  5. #13
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    I found this on the CDC website and it kinda explains how this vaccine was made so quickly. It's a new process.

    "New Approach to Vaccines
    mRNA vaccines are a new type of vaccine to protect against infectious diseases. To trigger an immune response, many vaccines put a weakened or inactivated germ into our bodies. Not mRNA vaccines. Instead, they teach our cells how to make a protein—or even just a piece of a protein—that triggers an immune response inside our bodies. That immune response, which produces antibodies, is what protects us from getting infected if the real virus enters our bodies.
    A Closer Look at How COVID-19 mRNA Vaccines Work
    COVID-19 mRNA vaccines give instructions for our cells to make a harmless piece of what is called the “spike protein.” The spike protein is found on the surface of the virus that causes COVID-19.

    COVID-19 mRNA vaccines are given in the upper arm muscle. Once the instructions (mRNA) are inside the immune cells, the cells use them to make the protein piece. After the protein piece is made, the cell breaks down the instructions and gets rid of them.

    Next, the cell displays the protein piece on its surface. Our immune systems recognize that the protein doesn’t belong there and begin building an immune response and making antibodies, like what happens in natural infection against COVID-19.

    At the end of the process, our bodies have learned how to protect against future infection. The benefit of mRNA vaccines, like all vaccines, is those vaccinated gain this protection without ever having to risk the serious consequences of getting sick with COVID-19.
    Facts about COVID-19 mRNA Vaccines
    They cannot give someone COVID-19.

    mRNA vaccines do not use the live virus that causes COVID-19.
    They do not affect or interact with our DNA in any way.

    mRNA never enters the nucleus of the cell, which is where our DNA (genetic material) is kept.
    The cell breaks down and gets rid of the mRNA soon after it is finished using the instructions.
    COVID-19 mRNA Vaccines Will Be Rigorously Evaluated for Safety
    mRNA vaccines have been held to the same rigorous safety and effectiveness standardsexternal icon as all other types of vaccines in the United States. The only COVID-19 vaccines the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) will make available for use in the United States (by approval or emergency use authorization) are those that meet these standards.

    mRNA Vaccines Are New, But Not Unknown
    Researchers have been studying and working with mRNA vaccines for decades. Interest has grown in these vaccines because they can be developed in a laboratory using readily available materials. This means the process can be standardized and scaled up, making vaccine development faster than traditional methods of making vaccines.

    mRNA vaccines have been studied before for flu, Zika, rabies, and cytomegalovirus (CMV). As soon as the necessary information about the virus that causes COVID-19 was available, scientists began designing the mRNA instructions for cells to build the unique spike protein into an mRNA vaccine.

    Future mRNA vaccine technology may allow for one vaccine to provide protection for multiple diseases, thus decreasing the number of shots needed for protection against common vaccine-preventable diseases.

    Beyond vaccines, cancer research has used mRNA to trigger the immune system to target specific cancer cells.
    Source:
    https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019...ines/mrna.html
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  7. #14
    Distinguished Community Member Lazarus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ikoiko View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    Linda, as far as what phase to put people in, my doctor was going off the Massachusetts COVID-19 website. So if you have MS and are also a health care worker, you would be in Phase I with all the other health care workers. That starts December 21. My doctor's office will not be giving shots, and he did not recommend where to get them.

    I think our snow storm will hit Wednesday night through Thursday, and we should get about a foot where I am on the coast. Best to you if you have to go out.

    Thanks! I was getting my rituxan the day before it snowed. What luck! We got about a foot of snow and it was very light. It is almost gone from the farm’s roadways now but there are huge piles all over the farm! I just heard Fauci talking and he said that people who received monoclonal antibodies should maybe weight for 3 months before getting the vaccine. Isn’t that what rituxan is? Monoclonal antibodies? (It is 12/21 about 6:30 pm as I write this).
    Uc
    Linda~~~~

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  9. #15
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    ((((((Hugs to All)))))) ~

    funnylegs4 ~

    Thank you for sharing the CDC information on the vaccine.

    I have seen interviews with people, who have received the vaccine, and so far no one is reporting any untoward effects from it. The wait is 3 weeks before the second dose. With luck, the absence of reactions will continue after the second dose.

    Jim received Opdivo, immunotherapy, infusions, which is an mRNA drug. It triggered a severe RA flare, for which he took Prednisone. This is why I am concerned about getting the COVID vaccine, since I have RA and psoriasis.

    Time will tell whether this should be a concern, and hopefully, we will learn more about the safety of it for MS patients.

    Love & Light,



    Rose

    *Virtual Hugs Are Germ-Free!
    Last edited by Earth Mother 2 Angels; 12-21-2020 at 04:19 PM.
    Mom to Jon, 49, and Michael, 32, who were born with an undiagnosed progressive neuromuscular disease and courageous spirits. Our Angel Michael received his wings in 2003. Our Angel Jon received his wings April 2019. April 2020, Jim, the world's most wonderful Dad, joined them. Now, they all watch over me.

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  11. #16
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    Linda

    Yes, the -mab at the end of rituxamab stands for ďmonoclonal antibody.Ē

    ANN
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  13. #17
    Distinguished Community Member agate's Avatar
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    I just heard Fauci talking and he said that people who received monoclonal antibodies should maybe weight for 3 months before getting the vaccine. Isnít that what rituxan is? Monoclonal antibodies?
    I was just watching the PBS evening news, where Dr. Fauci was being interviewed. Replying to a question about why the President was delaying getting the COVID-19 vaccine, Dr. Fauci said that that was probably because when the President had the virus he received a monoclonal antibody.

    He went on to say that anyone getting passive infusions of a monoclonal antibody should wait 90 days before getting the COVID-19 vaccine, and he explained why.

    I apologize for not having time just now to find a link to his exact words.
    MS, diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2001-2004. Copaxone 2006-2009. Glatiramer acetate (generic Copaxone) since December 2020.

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  15. #18
    Distinguished Community Member SuzE-Q's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lazarus View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    I just heard Fauci talking and he said that people who received monoclonal antibodies should maybe weight for 3 months before getting the vaccine. Isnít that what rituxan is? Monoclonal antibodies?
    I'm no expert, but I believe Dr. Fauci is likely referring to the monoclonal antibody cocktails specifically developed for and available under emergency authorization for covid, not monoclonal antibody treatments in general.

    Monoclonal antibodies are laboratory-produced molecules, and used to treat numerous illnesses.

    I could be wrong, but I just can't see why he'd mean all monoclonal antibody treatments. I think he was using a shorthand because people were wondering why Trump has to wait to be vaccinated. Most people assume "monoclonal antibodies = Trump's elite treatment". That's probably what Dr. Fauci was responding to.
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  17. #19
    Distinguished Community Member agate's Avatar
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    Found it:

    You know, there is a reason for him not to, Judy, because he received a passive transfer of monoclonal antibody when he was sick.And that makes the level of antibody very high in your body, which can interfere with the efficacy of a vaccine. So, it is recommended that, if you do receive a passive infusion of monoclonal antibody, that you don't get vaccinated for about 90 days. So, he is still within the limit of 90 days.
    So, I think, sooner or later, he should ultimately get vaccinated, but the fact that he is not vaccinated now, I think, is not inappropriate. I think it goes along with the recommendations of when someone should be vaccinated.
    https://www.pbs.org/newshour/show/fa...irus-mutations

    It's not clear to me whether he means all monoclonal antibodies or just those used to treat COVID-19.
    Last edited by agate; 12-21-2020 at 10:07 PM.
    MS, diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2001-2004. Copaxone 2006-2009. Glatiramer acetate (generic Copaxone) since December 2020.

    "A person with multiple sclerosis walks into a bar ... and a table, and a chair, and a wall."


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  19. #20

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    I, too, is still undecided whether it will be good for me and my family to get the vaccine. Hopefully, in a couple of months, we will have a well-documented report of the effectiveness of the vaccine.

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