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Thread: Messages from Tom Cat

  1. #61
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    He really knows the names of all those flowers. Amazing! I wonder if he has any honeysuckle that makes things smell really good. I use to love to get near honeysuckle just to get a whiff of it.
    Virginia

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  3. #62
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    ((((((Hugs to All)))))) ~

    agate ~

    Thank you for posting all of these photos of such gorgeous flowers! And thank you TC for sharing your abundant flora with us!

    I have always been fond of Queen Anne's lace, and I even grew it in the backyard for awhile. It is so graceful and delicate and looks lovely in flower arrangements. It does shed a lot, however.

    How beautiful your home and land are, TC.

    Love & Light,



    Rose

    *Virtual Hugs Are Germ-Free!
    Mom to Jon, 49, and Michael, 32, who were born with an undiagnosed progressive neuromuscular disease and courageous spirits. Our Angel Michael received his wings in 2003. Our Angel Jon received his wings April 2019. April 2020, Jim, the world's most wonderful Dad, joined them. Now, they all watch over me.

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  5. #63
    Distinguished Community Member agate's Avatar
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    From TomCat on Tuesday:
    If we can keep this masking and distancing up, we should get COVID-19 under control. The testing needs to be more widespread, but if it takes over 3 days for results, the tracing is lost. Our friends in Canada think we've lost it. In the meantime I'm sending you a picture of 2 hen turkeys, with 14 plus young. The young are about the size of large chickens. ...Turkeys are good at eating ticks too.

    (I finally found the young turkeys in the photo but am not sure I'm looking at 14 of them....)


    Last edited by agate; 07-26-2020 at 03:24 PM.
    MS, diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2001-2004. Copaxone 2006-2009.

    "Always put off until tomorrow whatever you think you should do today." --Anonymous



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  7. #64
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    I found the two grownups, but only two of the little ones.
    Virginia

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  9. #65
    Distinguished Community Member agate's Avatar
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    I think I'm seeing two little ones alongside the grownup on the left and maybe a couple of little ones in front of the grownup on the right?
    MS, diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2001-2004. Copaxone 2006-2009.

    "Always put off until tomorrow whatever you think you should do today." --Anonymous



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  11. #66
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    I think you may be right Agate!
    Virginia

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  13. #67
    Distinguished Community Member agate's Avatar
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    From Tom Cat (Wednesday):

    Plugging along here. Getting a few things done outside. The temperature has varied at night from upward of 75 down to 58, and most days hitting 85 to 90 or more by late afternoon. Got a couple of days hitting 100 on the sunny side of the house in the afternoon.

    I've been starting to collect seed from some of the prairie flowers. ...Latest [project?] is clipping off all the dead limbs on a juniper bush below the kitchen window and crawling under and cleaning years of debris out. Got really scratched up, but it looks nice now. I want to put in some low, under 6-inch ground cover under it that's shade tolerant. There's a really fine sedge, Pennsylvania sedge, that grows under the oaks in the woods here. I'm going to transplant some of it for the ground cover. The plant nurseries want $10 for a 2-inch pot, so I figure it's worth me digging some up and transplanting it. In the meantime I'm trying to get stuff out up in the house.

    Spending more time reading and still working on finances. ... I have had some exciting wildlife around. There is a bear in the area that takes out around 6 stalks of corn at our neighbor with a small produce garden. He may have been over here, taking down one bird feeder at night. Then there are the raccoons, 2 or 3 of them.They've been into a couple of bird feeders here several nights. Usually when I run out and make noise they take off. Most of the time I pull the feeders in at night. The one big one I throw small rocks at. I always miss, so they don't pay much attention to me. I did that one night, and as I turned around, there was this young one within 4 feet, looking down at me from a feeder. I threw a rock at it, and it just stared at me. It wouldn't move. It looked like he/she was puzzled that I would interrupt it having a meal. I picked up a 4-foot light metal rod and poked at it. It didn't move. I hit it lightly in the butt and it just wiggled a little. I finally hit it a little harder in the shoulder, and it dropped to the ground and ran off. I didn't want to hurt it but sure didn't want it close to the door.

    A day or two later the raccoons were back, but when I opened the door they ran off. They are quiet but they can be mean. Funny the young one I hit with the rod never hissed at me or made any aggressive moves. Just looked bewildered.

    Then a night ago in the bedroom, around 11 PM, Maggie is looking intently out the window. The window is 10 feet or so above the ground. So I take the flashlight out and look outside the window. A foot or so away in a couch type feeder is a flying squirrel, [settling] down and having her fill of sunflower seeds. That was neat. First time I've seen one on the property.

    I'm glad to know folks on BrainTalk still think I have something to contribute. I see MS has made it into the network medical [ads?] these days. I see there are new drugs out that may help advanced MS problems. Let me know how these drugs may help. Meanwhile it would be nice if the powers that be would come up [with] enforcement of preventive measures for COVID-19 that are uniform across the country. Stay safe and take care.


    MS, diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2001-2004. Copaxone 2006-2009.

    "Always put off until tomorrow whatever you think you should do today." --Anonymous



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  15. #68
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    Another from Tom Cat (Thursday). I had to do a double take before realizing that the squirrel is hanging upside down, in the way squirrels do:


    Here is our black squirrel this morning. It's a nice cool and breezy 65-degree morning right now.

    Finally getting back to eating better. Eating alone is very hard for me, and my appetite comes and goes.

    I get a call from our friends next door whom we have known for over 52 years. We were students with them at college in the late 60s. Until a month or so ago, I was having tea with them twice a day. Because of COVID-19, and one of them having kidney failure after a transplant about 6 years back, I was asked not to come in the house for tea or meals. So that has led to more isolation for me. He calls me every morning around 9 AM. So I'm on my own most of the time.

    Hard to believe a year ago Ann was cooking up a storm and doing all the book work still. Her niece from Florida was here, and I was at my fur trade rendezvous.... Time does move on, doesn't it?

    I'm wishing you all the best. Take care.
    MS, diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2001-2004. Copaxone 2006-2009.

    "Always put off until tomorrow whatever you think you should do today." --Anonymous



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  17. #69
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    I think we are all proud of Ralph. He is managing as best he can in Ann's absence. For someone who didn't know about their finances or how to cook, I think he is doing well. I am sorry he has lost the companionship of his neighbors and I hope it will be restored some day. However, I am glad the neighbor is calling and checking on him every morning. I hope he tries to continue to eat well.

    Thank you Agate, for once again getting his messages to us. You can tell him sometime that we don't know of anyone on this forum who is going on any of the new MS drugs. Tell him they are a little hyped up on TV.
    Virginia

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  19. #70
    Distinguished Community Member agate's Avatar
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    Tom Cat has shared some information on how gentlemen dressed in another era. I had just recently got around to sending him the replies here about the gentleman's costume he was wearing in the photo:

    From Monday--
    Good morning! A cool 56 or so outside. Having my breakfast of grilled cheese and 2nd cup of coffee. Really, really enjoyed all the messages you relayed to me from other folks on Brain Talk.

    I'll try to get to the swivel cannon and especially the gentlemen's clothing of late 1700s through the beginning of the 1800s. I'll be trying to show you a picture of my gentleman's outfit and the voyageur clothes of the period. My outfit is a mixture of French and English clothes of the period.

    Since all you ladies seem to be curious about the double fly pants, which are French, I may start there. Note: At the time men's trousers and pants DID NOT have belts to hold them up. There is a set of buttons or a drawstring in the back that you adjust for your waist size. In the front there are 2 large buttons to hold the waist together. There are 2-3 layers of heavy cloth in the waistband to keep your pants together. Now most European trousers of the period had a square drop front on pants, like most navvies had into the 1960s. The French, setting the new clothes styles over many centuries, came up with the buttoned double fly in about 1780. They kept it into about 1829. I don't know why they stopped using it, except the design does put more tension on the front closer. It isn't until the mid-1800s that the present fly, with buttons and now zippers or Velcro, comes into being. With this come suspenders and belts. Through most of history, belts are used to hang things on, like water bottles, swords, small game bags, etc. Apparently no one thought of holding your pants up with a belt until about 1850.



    To start the day, my cat Maggie is lying in an overstuffed chair. She's resting after her breakfast and doesn't want to be disturbed. It's nice and sunny in the chair. I get the unsunny chair in the 65-degree house this morning.

    Now for upper class clothing around the turn of the 19th century. Yes, most gentlemen and ladies, as well as military officers, had servants to dress them. In the fur trade forts, most of the clerks and most voyageurs had country wives, as they were called. These were native women married by native custom. Often the men wintered over with the native wife and family. The families got trade goods in exchange for feeding the fur trade guy over the winter. this made it cheaper to keep voyageurs over winter in the beaver-trading areas. Different companies had different rules here. But the bottom line was: as long as it helped relationships with native trappers and profits for the company, it was okay. This was a business, with personal relationships secondary.

    Please note: The first European or European American woman, the wife of a company clerk, to come into the Great Lakes region, was in 1835. She was an artist and did many paintings of the fur trade. Also, most native men thought voyageurs were crazy for carrying 180-lb. fur bales between portages. That was women's work. Country wives had it hard but not as hard as with their own families.

    If you and other folks on Brain Talk would like bits of this history, I'm more than happy to add a few tidbits now and then. Yes, the clothes of gentlemen and ladies were fashionable, but frequently uncomfortable. As I tell folks who see me in these clothes and ask if I don't feel overheated in warm weather, I say, "If I'm comfortable, then I'm not in gentleman's clothes."

    Now I'm going to send a picture of me in my gentleman's outfit.



    MS, diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2001-2004. Copaxone 2006-2009.

    "Always put off until tomorrow whatever you think you should do today." --Anonymous



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