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Thread: Actress Selma Blair's Recent Treatment for MS

  1. #1
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    Default Actress Selma Blair's Recent Treatment for MS

    ((((((Hugs to All))))) ~

    Actress Selma Blair, who we discussed here not long ago, was just released from a hospital after receiving an undisclosed treatment. So far, I haven't found an article naming the treatment. In one article, a commenter speculated that she had received HSCT.

    Selma is People Magazine's cover story:

    https://people.com/tv/selma-blair-ce...-ms-treatment/

    It's annoying with all of its ads and motion on the page, but if you continue scrolling down after the first story, there are a couple of other stories about Selma, including one about the bike she uses.

    Here's another article about Selma, which includes her Instagram post. The treatment will compromise her immune system.

    https://www.huffpost.com/entry/selma...b0ef792e0aca9d

    Unfortunately, a compromised immune system is typical of many drugs used to treat conditions such as MS, RA, cancer ...

    I truly hope that this treatment works for Selma and is an option for you and for everyone, who has MS.

    Love & Light,



    Rose
    Mom to Jon, 49, (seizure disorder; Gtube; trache; colostomy; osteoporosis; hypothyroid; enlarged prostate; lymphedema, assorted mysteries) and Michael, 32, (intractable seizures; Gtube), who were born with an undiagnosed progressive neuromuscular disease and courageous spirits. Our Angel Michael received his wings in 2003. Our Angel Jon received his wings April 2019. Now, they watch over Jim and me.

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    Distinguished Community Member agate's Avatar
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    My guess is that she's had HSCT. Not sure why she felt she had to shave her head. I haven't heard that that is done with that treatment or with any MS treatment. Hair loss occurs with some cancer treatments but I haven't heard of extreme hair loss with any MS treatment.

    So young to be losing her speech and other functions. Many here have been there and done that but it's still sad when you see someone else dwindling into MS.
    i don't trip--I do random gravity checks.

    MS diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2002-2005. Copaxone 6/07 - 5/10.
    Member of this MS board since 2001.

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    ((((((Hugs to All)))))) ~

    agate ~

    I found an article from a 2014 study, which refers to HSCT as chemotherapy. Hair loss is a side effect.


    “HSCT is not one therapy but a range of therapies from a more mild type of chemo to a stronger type,” Bruce Bebo, PhD, executive vice president of research at the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, told Healthline. “Dr. Burt practices a more mild form of chemotherapy — more mild form of immunosuppression — so the risks are lower.”
    Due to potential visible side effects with the chemo such as hair loss, a “blind reader” reviewed the results of the tests during the trial. This reader was off site and had no access to the participants.
    HSCT permanently changes your immune system. The long-term consequences are not known.

    “HSCT is not a trivial treatment,” cautions Bebo. “It greatly suppresses bodies’ ability to fight infection for weeks or months. Patients are hospitalized for days or weeks.”
    https://www.healthline.com/health-ne...ell-treatments

    And here’s a PDF from Mass General describing HSCT, referring to it as a bone marrow transplant, which is administered by hematologists and oncologists:

    https://www.massgeneral.org/cancer/a...Transplant.pdf

    It sounds grueling and scary.

    Love & Light,



    Rose
    Mom to Jon, 49, (seizure disorder; Gtube; trache; colostomy; osteoporosis; hypothyroid; enlarged prostate; lymphedema, assorted mysteries) and Michael, 32, (intractable seizures; Gtube), who were born with an undiagnosed progressive neuromuscular disease and courageous spirits. Our Angel Michael received his wings in 2003. Our Angel Jon received his wings April 2019. Now, they watch over Jim and me.

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    Distinguished Community Member agate's Avatar
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    It's definitely scary. Peg had the stem-cell treatment--I'm not sure which type it was--some years ago.
    i don't trip--I do random gravity checks.

    MS diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2002-2005. Copaxone 6/07 - 5/10.
    Member of this MS board since 2001.

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    I don't think it was the same type Agate though I am not totally sure. They went into her abdomen (I think) and then injected the cells into her spinal cord. I do recall that they (she and Joe) spent only one night in Florida where it was done and flew back home immediately. They wanted her to go back for more treatments, but she said that she and Joe did not think it was worth it. It cost somewhere between $10,000 and $12,500. She told us and I can't exactly remember that.
    Virginia

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    I remember Peg having "stem cell" treatment but it did not entail killing her immune system with chemo drugs. As I recall they took fat cells from her abdomen, did something to the cells (spin?) and injected them back into her. When she didn't' have the expected improvement, they wanted her to repeat the procedure 6 months later. At a cost of $10,000 per treatment not covered by insurance, she opted to forgo any more treatments. That treatment sounded like a lot of smoke and mirrors to me. There are too many greedy people preying on the sick desperate, sad.

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    You are right Nuthatch it definitely did not entail chemo drugs. It was quick and fast - a one night stay and that was it. I don't think she got any benefit at all from it. In addition to the $10,000 they had to pay for their air fare there and back to Iowa. I think the $10,000 did include the one night stay.
    Virginia

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    Distinguished Community Member agate's Avatar
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    Rogue stem-cell treatment facilities are a huge problem. I've seen more recent article about this but this one from 2017 in The Lancet tells about it:

    https://www.thelancet.com/journals/l...xt?elsca1=etoc

    I hope Peg's treatment was at one of the responsible places.
    Last edited by agate; 07-27-2019 at 05:55 PM.
    i don't trip--I do random gravity checks.

    MS diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2002-2005. Copaxone 6/07 - 5/10.
    Member of this MS board since 2001.

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    ((((((Hugs to All)))))) ~

    Please forgive me, if my post about Selma Blair was inappropriate or causes you any sadness about our dear, sweet Peg. Since Selma's MS had been discussed here, I thought this was an update on her treatment and condition, which might interest you.

    I don't know anything about stem cell treatment, nor what kinds of HSCT exist and how they are administered for each disease. Apparently, a bone marrow transplant is considered HSCT.

    The first link I found pertained to HSCT for MS. I included quotes to indicate that it was chemo, and hair loss occurs. Selma also asked for "No kisses," since she is immuno-compromised from the treatment.

    Of course, I also do not know what kind of HSCT Selma had, or even whether that is the treatment she received, as it has not been explained in any of the articles I've found about her.

    agate ~ I couldn't access your link about rogue stem cell treatment facilities, as it requires registration. I also hope that Peg's treatment was in a legitimate facility with skilled physicians.

    Love & Light,



    Rose
    Mom to Jon, 49, (seizure disorder; Gtube; trache; colostomy; osteoporosis; hypothyroid; enlarged prostate; lymphedema, assorted mysteries) and Michael, 32, (intractable seizures; Gtube), who were born with an undiagnosed progressive neuromuscular disease and courageous spirits. Our Angel Michael received his wings in 2003. Our Angel Jon received his wings April 2019. Now, they watch over Jim and me.

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    Distinguished Community Member agate's Avatar
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    I'm so sorry about the link. I didn't realize it required registration. Here are a couple of segments of it.

    From The Lancet, September 1, 2017--"The Dangers of Unregulated Stem Cell Marketing" by Dara Mohammadi (excerpted):

    In 2014, reality TV star Kim Kardashian had a high-profile facial. The beauty treatment was publicised to millions through social and general media and was reported to be able to rejuvenate the skin, thanks to one special ingredient—stem cells.

    “It's ridiculous, the level of pseudo-science nonsense that the public are exposed to around stem cells”, says Timothy Caulfield, a professor of health law at the University of Alberta, Canada. “If it's not celebrities getting facials, it's sport stars going off for radical stem-cell treatments. The perception that people get is that stem cells are like little magic helpers that can do all sorts of things. That idea is dangerous.”

    The danger is that it legitimises and feeds an altogether darker problem—the growth of unregulated clinics selling risky, untested, and unproven stem-cell treatments to patients. “We're not talking about a few rogue clinics”, adds Caulfield, “we're talking probably hundreds of clinics around the world, advertising, exaggerating benefits, and selling services for everything from anti-ageing procedures to treatments for backaches, multiple sclerosis, and [amyotrophic lateral sclerosis]”. He says that only few stem-cell treatments have been approved for use, including for some types of cancers and for severe burns.

    In July, with a group of international researchers, Caulfield published a call to action for the development of international regulations to crack down on the marketing of unproven stem-cell treatments. Given the nature of the market, nobody knows the true scale of the problem, but Caulfield estimates that tens of thousands of patients (including many children) have already been affected. With patients paying up to US$100 000 per treatment, this unregulated global market is worth hundreds of millions of dollars.

    The treatments can be dangerous. In the USA, for example, recipients of such treatments have developed painful bone fragments in their eyelids or mucous secreting nasal tissue in the spine. Increasing the risk of cancers is an ever-present concern with stem-cell treatments.

    The most experimental and invasive procedures are done in clinics in countries such as India and China, says Caulfield, but loopholes in US regulation allow North American clinics to get away with offering treatments. Clinics argue that if a treatment uses autologous cells (stem cells obtained from the same patient who will receive them), they are not pharmaceuticals and thus fall outside of the US Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) remit.

    ...


    The UK Stem Cell Foundation, a funding organisation and charity based in London, UK, was set up in 2005 to speed up the translation of promising stem-cell-based therapies to the clinic. Brendon Noble is a stem-cell scientist who sits on the Foundation's board. “Some stem cells do have the potential to turn into any cell and to remain as that cell type but one has to know how to make them do that first”, he says. “You don't just squirt them around the body and hope that, first, they find the right place to repair and, second, that they turn into the right cell when they get there. The vast majority of unregulated activities don't even have a credible scientific basis, it's not just that they haven't gone through process—they simply don't make a lot of sense.”

    A worry for Noble and the UK Stem Cell Foundation is that serious setbacks such as deaths and cancers in patients who receive unregulated treatments can have a negative effect on the whole field. “I harken back to the gene-therapy debacle [the 1999 death of a patient in a gene-therapy trial], which set the gene therapy field back almost 10 years”, he says. “I honestly believe that stem cells can be the next major development in medicine—we're talking organ transplantation and penicillin level change—which could potentially be destroyed or seriously set back by unregulated activity.”
    ...





    And, Rose, if your post about Selma Blair was upsetting in any way to anyone, I haven't been aware of it. I think that it was interesting and important for us to know about.
    Last edited by agate; 07-28-2019 at 05:26 PM.
    i don't trip--I do random gravity checks.

    MS diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2002-2005. Copaxone 6/07 - 5/10.
    Member of this MS board since 2001.

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