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Thread: Selma Blair and MS

  1. #11
    Distinguished Community Member Earth Mother 2 Angels's Avatar
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    ((((((Hugs to All)))))) ~

    I was referring to the high heels Selma was wearing during the interview. I don't know what kind of shoes she had on with her Oscars gown. But the video of the interview shows her walking with Robin, and Selma is wearing black heels.

    I also wore heels for work ~ the "dress for success" look we were snookered into! I don't know how women can stand wearing stilettos now. They will regret it when they are seniors. Guarantee it! Give me sneakers!

    Love & Light,



    Rose
    Mom to Jon, 49, (seizure disorder; Gtube; trache; colostomy; osteoporosis; hypothyroid; enlarged prostate; lymphedema, assorted mysteries) and Michael, 32, (intractable seizures; Gtube), who were born with an undiagnosed progressive neuromuscular disease and courageous spirits. Our Angel Michael received his wings in 2003. Our Angel Jon received his wings April 2019. Now, they watch over Jim and me.

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  3. #12
    Distinguished Community Member agate's Avatar
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    Walking in those ridiculous shoes looks pretty difficult for her, doesn't it? She's probably under pressure from her managers to maintain her stylish appearance. I hope she can woman up and tell some of them to get lost so she can wear clothes that enable her to do a few things other than look like a fashion model. But I guess it's all about a person's "image" in that line of work, or that's what I've heard. You don't see much of actors after they've started to age visibly or have physical problems though every now and then nowadays there are glimpses.

    Michael J. Fox appearing in quite a large part in "The Good Wife" may have helped. In spite of showing obvious signs of Parkinson's, he played a lawyer.
    i don't trip--I do random gravity checks.

    MS diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2002-2005. Copaxone 6/07 - 5/10.
    Member of this MS board since 2001.

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  5. #13
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    I wore high heels all my life until I couldn't due to MS. I never wore the ridiculously high ones like they wear now. Mine were more like 3" heels most of the time. I loved wearing them. I felt so dressed up and all during those years I enjoyed the feeling of being dressed up. However, I still do not see how she could be in the ones she had on and be walking with a cane or on someone's arm. However, I wish her lots of luck. She is young and I do hope her Neuro is right in that she will get 90 percent of her abilities back. Maybe with a good DMD and given her young age she might. At least for some years.
    Virginia

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  7. #14
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    ((((((Hugs to All)))))) ~

    agate ~

    I thought the terrain was inappropriate for high heels, regardless of ability. My first thought, as it always applies to my old self now, was: "Why take the risk of falling?" There are many fashionable styles of flats (see: Michelle Obama) and comfortable shoes.

    Your comment about managers and agents trying to influence her image reminds me of the movie "A Star Is Born." In every version, the female lead is influenced by her manager to do something other than what she wants to do.

    Selma is active in the industry right now. Here's her IMDB page:

    https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0004757/

    I'm glad that she is getting work.

    Virginia ~

    I felt the same way as you did wearing high heels.

    Upon reflection, I think that's what we were "trained" to believe about ourselves through fashion magazines, movies, television, etc. I think of TV shows like "Father Knows Best," "The Donna Reed Show," "I Love Lucy," etc. All of the housewives wore dresses and heels around their homes as they cleaned and cooked.

    Meanwhile, men had 3 suits, 5 ties, 7 shirts, and 2 pairs of shoes. Comfortable shoes.

    I used to lift my boys into/out of their chairs, when I picked them up after school, wearing high heels. I even lifted a wheelchair into the trunk of my Toyota in high heels. They just became an extension of me, like stilts. I think I still have a couple of pairs of heels in our bedroom closet! I'm not waiting for them to come back into style, because I only wear walking shoes now.

    Ah, youth ...

    Love & Light,



    Rose
    Mom to Jon, 49, (seizure disorder; Gtube; trache; colostomy; osteoporosis; hypothyroid; enlarged prostate; lymphedema, assorted mysteries) and Michael, 32, (intractable seizures; Gtube), who were born with an undiagnosed progressive neuromuscular disease and courageous spirits. Our Angel Michael received his wings in 2003. Our Angel Jon received his wings April 2019. Now, they watch over Jim and me.

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  9. #15
    Distinguished Community Member agate's Avatar
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    I guess I was lucky enough to live in an area where all of the moms dressed very casually. You never knew when you might have to scramble up on a slide or jungle gym to retrieve a child, and you dressed for mobility and comfort. Sneakers were what I wore as a mom but when I had to work at a paying job, I wore heels. Because getting to/from the job usually involved quite a bit of walking, I carried the heels in a shoe bag and wore comfortable shoes for getting there and back. Sometimes I kept the shoe bag with the shoes in it at work so I wouldn't have to carry them back and forth.

    You'd never see a man doing something like that--wearing an uncomfortable shoe at work just because it was stylish and "expected."

    It was expected then--of women. It was expected for office jobs and in teaching. The reason probably given in teaching was so that we (short) women would be able to see our entire class from the front of the room, and they could see us better if we were elevated a bit.

    Fair enough but I'm not so sure if there was any good reason for expecting heels to be worn for office jobs.

    We're brainwashed into thinking we're just not good enough as we are, and this seems to have been true in many cultures over time. Has anyone besides me ever seen and been horrified by the photos of how women's feet were sadly deformed because of the Oriental custom of binding girl babies' feet so that they'd turn out dainty and small?
    i don't trip--I do random gravity checks.

    MS diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2002-2005. Copaxone 6/07 - 5/10.
    Member of this MS board since 2001.

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  11. #16
    Distinguished Community Member Sunshine's Avatar
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    Many banks still require that their employees, even tellers on their feet, wear heels.

    Lots of the way women dress is brainwashing by Madison Ave , fashion industry, and Hollywood. It basically says you have to be sex symbols. That is your worth.

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  13. #17
    Distinguished Community Member agate's Avatar
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    If you need to be so carefully packaged just to be acceptable, it does tend to make you feel like an object....
    i don't trip--I do random gravity checks.

    MS diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2002-2005. Copaxone 6/07 - 5/10.
    Member of this MS board since 2001.

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  15. #18
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    Tight pants, high heels and a patent leather cane with a pink diamond . . . and MS . . . oh my! Priorities?
    Noticed that Selma exchanged places with the interviewer as they walked along the narrow brick pathway beside the swimming pool. Wouldn't have looked too good if she lost her balance and fell in!

    Sad that her livelihood is dependent on having a voice, especially being a single mom.

    Thank you for sharing that, Agate. Until I saw this, I didn't realize that MS could be responsible for my recently quavering voice from time to time. TG it's not nearly as bad or consistent as she's experiencing.
    Last edited by nuthatch; 03-05-2019 at 12:14 AM.

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  17. #19
    Distinguished Community Member agate's Avatar
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    My speech problems aren't as bad as hers either but I'm more and more reluctant to say anything if I have to speak. I never know what it's going to come out like, and people sometimes seem to get tired of waiting for me to put my words together.
    i don't trip--I do random gravity checks.

    MS diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2002-2005. Copaxone 6/07 - 5/10.
    Member of this MS board since 2001.

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