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Thread: Positive study on high dose Biotin for PPMS

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    Distinguished Community Member Lazarus's Avatar
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    Default Positive study on high dose Biotin for PPMS

    MD1003 (high-dose biotin) for the treatment of progressive multiple sclerosis: A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. - PubMed - NCBI

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27589059

    This is the last line of the report: “CONCLUSION:
    MD1003 achieves sustained reversal of MS-related disability in a subset of patients with progressive MS and is well tolerated.”
    © The Author(s), 2016.
    Last edited by Lazarus; 01-06-2019 at 12:17 PM.
    Linda~~~~

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    Distinguished Community Member SuzE-Q's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lazarus View Post
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    MD1003 (high-dose biotin) for the treatment of progressive multiple sclerosis: A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. - PubMed - NCBI

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27589059

    This is the last line of the report: “CONCLUSION:
    MD1003 achieves sustained reversal of MS-related disability in a subset of patients with progressive MS and is well tolerated.”
    © The Author(s), 2016.
    This is from 2016 and was a very small, open label study. But a more recent, small study showed an increase in inflammation and disease activity in the biotin group for those with Primary Progressive MS.

    https://www.uspharmacist.com/article...progressive-ms

    This was presented at ECTRIMS in 2017:

    https://onlinelibrary.ectrims-congre...=18238*media=2
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    Distinguished Community Member Lazarus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SuzE-Q View Post
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    This is from 2016 and was a very small, open label study. But a more recent, small study showed an increase in inflammation and disease activity in the biotin group for those with Primary Progressive MS.

    https://www.uspharmacist.com/article...progressive-ms

    This was presented at ECTRIMS in 2017:

    https://onlinelibrary.ectrims-congre...=18238*media=2

    Thanks for clarifying!......
    Linda~~~~

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    Distinguished Community Member SuzE-Q's Avatar
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    Just to follow up, in the 2018 ECTRIMS, I just read through, I think it was Agate's link, to see if Biotin was discussed further last year. It was (this looked at SPMS and PPMS, older, more disabled MSers):

    https://mymsaa.org/news/2018-ectrims...m_medium=email

    French study details impact of biotin on disability measure, walking speed


    
Biotin is a vitamin involved in energy metabolism and fatty acid synthesis, including the activation of an enzyme in myelin synthesis.

    In the MS-SPI study, a high-dose, pharmaceutical-grade biotin known as MD1003 reversed MS-related disease disability in 13 percent of patients with progressive multiple sclerosis (PMS).

    To assess the efficacy and safety of MD1003 in a real-world setting, as opposed to in a clinical trial such as MS-SPI, researchers monitored outcomes in primary-progressive MS (PPMS) and secondary-progressive MS (SPMS) patients at a clinic in France. [Ciron P1222]

    From January 2016 through May 2018, 220 individuals with progressive MS who were receiving care at the clinic in Toulouse, France, received 300 mg/day of the oral medication. At the ECTRIMS 2018 meeting, researchers presented data on the first 91 patients to complete one year of follow-up. Those patients’ mean age at baseline was 59.5 years. Sixty-two percent were females, and 70 percent had SPMS. The mean Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score at baseline was 5.9, and their mean timed 25-foot walk time was 50.7 seconds.

    At the end of one year of treatment with MD1003, 23 percent of the participants had an improvement in their EDSS score and 23 percent had a 20 percent or greater improvement in the time it took them to walk 25 feet. During the one-year period, 11 percent of patients had active disease, such as a clinically defined relapse, a gadolinium-enhancing T1 lesion on MRI, or both.

    Researchers said, “This real-world study supports the growing body of evidence that MD1003 is an effective and safe treatment for PMS.”

    Please Note that my posts may have been arbitrarily altered by a Moderator and may not reflect my original content.

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