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Thread: Study shows connection between MS and hypertension

  1. #1
    Distinguished Community Member Lazarus's Avatar
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    Default Study shows connection between MS and hypertension

    This interested me because hypertension is a problem of mine. This study connects it to MS because of intrusions into the blood brain barrier.

    “People with multiple sclerosis are 48 percent more likely to have high blood pressure compared to the general population — and to people with other demyelinating diseases, a new study reports. Its researchers also emphasize that hypertension is already linked to poorer outcomes in MS patients.

    The study, “,” was published in the journal Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders.

    Like all demyelinating diseases, MS is marked by damage to the protective cover – called myelin – that surrounds nerve fibers in the brain, optic nerves, and spinal cord.

    Two other diseases, neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD), and transverse myelitis (TM), are also demyelinating disorders of the central nervous system. But the three have widely different clinical characteristics, and comorbidities — while common in MS patients — have not been studied extensively in NMOSD and TM.

    Researchers with Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio, investigated the prevalence of cardiovascular conditions like hypertension in a group of MS, NMOSD, and TM patients in the U.S. Cardiovascular conditions, even those that develop in people with other diseases (as a comorbidity), are generally considered modifiable through diet and exercise. But few large-scale studies have looked into their prevalence or burden in people with demyelinating diseases.

    Those that have suggest that cardiovascular conditions are either as prevalent or more prevalent in people with MS and NMOSD than healthy people.

    Using a case-control study (people enrolled in the Accelerated Cure Project and treated at special clinics), the research team compared the burden of several cardiovascular-associated diseases — type 2 diabetes, heart disease, hyperlipidemia (high levels of fat in blood, or high cholesterol), and hypertension (high blood pressure) — in 1,548 MS patients, 306 NMOSD patients, and 145 people with TM, and then compared findings with those of 677 controls without a demyelinating disease.

    “In MS cases, we observed an elevated burden of hypertension compared to the controls,” the researchers wrote, noting a number of earlier studies also “demonstrated adverse associations between cardiovascular conditions and MS outcomes.”

    Interestingly, the prevalence of other cardiovascular conditions — including high cholesterol, diabetes, and heart disease — did not differ across patient groups and controls. Likewise, no differences were found in age of cardiovascular disease onset among patients and controls.

    Because of the link between cardiovascular ills and MS disease severity, they also recommend further studies to better “characterize the causal mechanisms underlying the associations between cardiovascular conditions and adverse MS outcomes; and to examine if similar associations exist in NMOSD and TM.”
    Linda~~~~

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    Distinguished Community Member Howie's Avatar
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    Thumbs up

    Before MS, the wife of my boss was a retired nurse, and about once a month or so, would come in the lunch room and take our BP. I had always registered a normal reading.

    I still was working there when I was DXed, and the next time she tested us, I was off the scale, and my next Dr. visit, I started on BP meds, and a cholesterol med, which I've been taking ever since.
    Evolution spans the Universe.

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    I use to have very low BP all the time. When I went to Neuro Friday it was 150/80something. Is that very high? Since I use to have such low BP I don't really know when to become alarmed about it.
    Virginia

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    Distinguished Community Member Howie's Avatar
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    Distinguished Community Member Cherie's Avatar
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    I just sent this article to my nephrologist who is helping me manage BP before opening BT and seeing that this article had been posted. This information is part of a clinical trial that I helped to approve and recruit for with the Accelerated Cure Project (www.iConquerMS.org ). We study issues which are important to the people with MS . Finding that more and more folks want info on whether a certain symptom or condition is worse in the MS Population or whether there is something to improve quality of life. These folks have lived with MS , often for decades and do not see a lengthy trial for a medicinal cure to be realistic in their lifetime and want better quality of life. My nephrologist actually told me three years ago that because so many of us with MS have autonomic nervous system disparities, we were predisposed to such things as hypertension and lower extremity edema.

    Virginia,
    They try to keep BP in the under 60 population in the vicinity of 120/80. Those over 65 are stretched to the 140/90 range from the American Academy of Nephrologists. I fall well within that range almost all of the time with a tiny dose of Bystolic but cannot take any of the other types of BP meds I have tried. They actually raise my BP.
    Last edited by Cherie; 07-23-2018 at 07:22 PM.

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    Thanks Cherie, I am definitely out of range according to these readings. I do not use salt, but no that I get it in many other ways besides cooking with it or salting my food. I do have lower extremity edema.

    Howie, thank you for the chart.
    Virginia

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    Distinguished Community Member Sunshine's Avatar
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    I have normal ronlow blood pressure my whole life and hope it stays that way. Last infusion, though, it spiked up.

    I bet it’s that the MS causes the BP problem via autonomic dysfunction.

    How does it compare with BP in other disorders that limit physical activity i wonder..

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    I generally have low blood pressure, but recently it has moved up into "normal" range --122/85. At least, "normal" as my doctor describes it. I don't take anything for it. There were times when I was really sick that it was way low , 85/60...and the doctors/nurses tending me were quite alarmed..and kept taking it and taking it, wondering if their equipment was working.

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    My BP is going up for sure. I had 85/60 when I was in my low 40s and then it moved up to normal, usually about 120/70 which was very good. It started up about two years ago and has now ended at this.

    I am going to try and get a good BP monitor and see if I can keep track of it.
    Virginia

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  19. #10
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    I have assumed the massive heart attack I had in 2005 as unrelated to MS (probably). I had an artery completely blocked. .I had never had my cholesterol checked and bp was a iittle high but i always explained it away as white coat syndrome.

    I had been under a lot of stress. My older brother had been in a coma for 10 months (meningitis) and passed away the week before. When they did the autopsy it turned out he had the same artery80% blocked. Anyway, I didn’t connect it to MS. My brother was in thin, got lots of exercise ate healthfully... I think for me my heart issues are genetic.

    Having had a heart attack I monitor bp, cholesterol and control it with diet, exercise and a bunch of drugs.
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