Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12

Thread: For all those people who keep telling you how to cure your MS...Dave Bexfield

  1. #1
    Distinguished Community Member Lazarus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    western MA
    Posts
    1,393

    Default For all those people who keep telling you how to cure your MS...Dave Bexfield

    Cure Thyself!
    SHARE RATE★★★★★
    By Dave Bexfield — ActiveMSers—March 15, 2018
    ABOUT THE AUTHOR VIEW ALL POSTS BY DAVE BEXFIELD — ACTIVEMSERS
    The curious trend of complete strangers giving you advice on how to treat your disease. And the new cure sweeping the internet inspires the ultimate challenge. Do you dare take it?

    When I got diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 2006, I expected challenges. Uncertainty. Gradually-improving-but-not-fast-enough research. But I didn’t expect the outpouring of advice-from friends, from family, from strangers-of how to best treat, nay cure, my disease. Never mind that today I run one of the largest and longest-running MS blogs and continually monitor MS research advances (and setbacks), the torrent of curative recommendations arrives almost daily. Yes, I always respond, I am fully aware of that cure. I’ve just been avoiding curing myself this whole time. Such a hassle.

    Being told repeatedly about cures
    Few four-letter words in the disease patient lexicon are more frustrating than “cure.” And in the dozen or so years I’ve had MS, I’ve had the pleasure of being told, repeatedly, about cures. That if I just took this one supplement or went on that one diet, all of my troubles would melt away like those unsightly glaciers clogging up our poles and national parklands. One time, my wife Laura was even pulled aside and told in a hushed voice that I just needed to drink more water. Hydrate. Why hadn’t I thought of that? And all this while I had been avoiding liquids.

    This isn’t new. A couple of decades ago my grandparents were knee-deep into shark cartilage supplements. After all, they and thousands of others reasoned that if sharks were able to avoid getting cancer, it made brilliant sense to take a supplement made of a random shark part. There were just two problems with this theory. One, sharks actually do get cancer. Two, it didn’t work.

    This leads me to my current favorite cure du jour: turmeric, that magic root commonly used in Indian cooking that turns food and fingers a burnt yellow. If you haven’t heard yet, it cures or treats some diseases, MS included, with remarkable efficiency. The leading example, armchair medical researchers like to cite, is Alzheimer’s Disease.

    Could there be benefits from turmeric?
    A single 2001 study found that in one rural Indian village, rates of Alzheimer’s were shockingly low. But the study was pockmarked with holes, starting with the fact that dementia is widely under-diagnosed in India, which is exacerbated in rural areas with limited medical resources. And with AD typically diagnosed later in life, it’s relevant that the life expectancy in India is in the lower half of all countries-lower than Mongolia, Cambodia, and Iraq-according to the latest World Health Organization statistics. People are dying before forms of dementia set in. Could there be other benefits, though, from turmeric?

    For some time now, researchers have been laser-focused on the anti-inflammatory properties of curcumin, the “special sauce” in turmeric. But the journal Nature reported in 2017 that after more than $150 million spent in research (government funded, not “big pharma”), more than 120 clinical trials, and thousands of research papers, scientists have yet to find any specific therapeutic benefits. None. Months later exasperated researchers published a lengthy article in the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry essentially asking not to over-research curcumin as it is an “unstable, reactive, nonbioavailable compound and, therefore, a highly improbable lead.” Then, in December of 2017, the other shoe dropped. Forget, for a moment, the findings of scientists and researchers. Snopes, the urban-legend-debunking website, classified the claim that turmeric can prevent dementia as decidedly false.

    Claims about turmeric persist
    The greater internet, however, would beg to differ. And according to the greater internet, what you might not have heard is that turmeric is also the ideal elixir for seemingly everything health related. Every. Single. Thing. I’m not exaggerating.

    And this brings me to my ultimate point: The Turmeric Challenge. This is a throw-down to all of you professional and amateur researchers out there. We now know according to the internet what turmeric treats (duh, most everything). The trick is finding what it doesn’t treat. After spending hours Googling turmeric (46 million results, a 10 million increase in six months) and every possible ailment I could think of, from rashes to diabetes to ALS, turmeric benefits them all. Try it. Erectile dysfunction, turmeric. Pink eye, turmeric. Hang nail? Hangover? Hashimoto’s? Turmeric, turmeric, turmeric. You are going to have to think outside the box. Way outside. Beyond gangrene, beyond Ebola.

    All this said, researchers acknowledge that there may be benefits of curcumin that they have not yet discovered. Plausible, they say. And, fueling the excitement of the turmeric cheerleaders, a newly published study out of UCLA showed a statistically significant benefit in a tiny randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Cue Jim Carrey from Dumb and Dumber… “So you’re telling me there’s a chance.”

    Indeed there is. But researchers have been down this road many, many times before. So that means for the time being, doctors in India are still gainfully employed and apparently still needed despite all the consumption of turmeric in the country. Good luck in your #TurmericChallenge. You are going to need it.
    Linda~~~~

    Be the kind of woman that when your feet hit the floor each morning the devil says:"Oh Crap, She's up!"

  2. The following 7 users say "thanks"


  3. #2
    Distinguished Community Member Sunshine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    4,277

    Default

    We must get the same email. He’s a great writer!

  4. The following 6 users say "thanks"


  5. #3
    Distinguished Community Member Cherie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Southeastern NE
    Posts
    1,587

    Default

    I know Dave personally. He is working with us at iConquerMS on our Engagement Committee and Social media. He had stem cell therapy and notes it improved things drastically for a little over 4 years but the benefit has now disappeared. And, yes, he is a good writer....and a very personable and funny guy.

  6. The following 7 users say "thanks"


  7. #4
    Distinguished Community Member Lazarus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    western MA
    Posts
    1,393

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Cherie View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    I know Dave personally. He is working with us at iConquerMS on our Engagement Committee and Social media. He had stem cell therapy and notes it improved things drastically for a little over 4 years but the benefit has now disappeared. And, yes, he is a good writer....and a very personable and funny guy.
    I have been reposting materials from the ActiveMsers forum for years. He is a unique fellow. I answered something he wrote and did not realize I was posting my response to him through Facebook. I got many many responses...from friends and family! He and I have shared much information about Ocrevus and Rituximab. He is the one who first posted Timothy Volmer’s analysis of the two meds. (Vollmer routinely calls Ocrevus “rituximabOcrevus”.. all one word.)
    Linda~~~~

    Be the kind of woman that when your feet hit the floor each morning the devil says:"Oh Crap, She's up!"

  8. The following 6 users say "thanks"


  9. #5
    Distinguished Community Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    W. Mass
    Posts
    189

    Default

    I walked into the gym on Thursday. I am presently fundraising for the MS Walk. Perhaps this is why he thought he was being helpful when he told me excitedly that the found the cure for MS. Stem cells. We were both at the front desk: I was checking in and he was leaving. I am sure this week we will have to discuss it further.:

    I think . But I may be wrong, no need to fund raise. They have found the cure.

    Not sure how to respond .
    Last edited by ssusan; 03-25-2018 at 10:59 AM.

  10. The following 6 users say "thanks"


  11. #6
    Distinguished Community Member Lazarus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    western MA
    Posts
    1,393

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ssusan View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    I walked into the gym on Thursday. I am presently fundraising for the MS Walk. Perhaps this is why he thought he was being helpful when he told me excitedly that the found the cure for MS. Stem cells. We were both at the front desk: I was checking in and he was leaving. I am sure this week we will have to discuss it further.:

    I think . But I may be wrong, no need to fund raise. They have found the cure.

    Not sure how to respond .
    Sunshine I think, has a thread (Cure in the news again...). where she posted that new stem cell procedure. Good to read but, Someone pointed out that it does not look very safe! The thread is relatively new and should be near the top of the list.
    Linda
    Last edited by Lazarus; 03-25-2018 at 02:51 PM.
    Linda~~~~

    Be the kind of woman that when your feet hit the floor each morning the devil says:"Oh Crap, She's up!"

  12. The following 7 users say "thanks"


  13. #7
    Distinguished Community Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    W. Mass
    Posts
    189

    Default

    Thanks, Linda. I figured I was not a canididate but long term results don’t look great. Flowers for Algeron comes to mind.

  14. The following 7 users say "thanks"


  15. #8
    Distinguished Community Member Sunshine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    4,277

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ssusan View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    Thanks, Linda. I figured I was not a canididate but long term results don’t look great. Flowers for Algeron comes to mind.
    Good analogy.

  16. The following 7 users say "thanks"


  17. #9
    Distinguished Community Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Midwest USA
    Posts
    700

    Default

    Yes, I heard it is only temporary.

  18. The following 7 users say "thanks"


  19. #10
    Distinguished Community Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    W. Mass
    Posts
    189

    Default

    I had a good discussion with that guy. He had seen the stem cell cure in a science journal he gets.
    Be the person your dog thinks you are

  20. The following 6 users say "thanks"


Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. What a typical neurological exam is telling your neurologist
    By Lazarus in forum Multiple Sclerosis
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 01-11-2018, 02:13 PM
  2. MS Cure?
    By Gabriella7 in forum Multiple Sclerosis
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 02-02-2017, 07:39 AM
  3. Think your way to a cure
    By Gary in forum Multiple Sclerosis
    Replies: 34
    Last Post: 09-12-2014, 09:00 AM
  4. Replies: 9
    Last Post: 08-16-2014, 10:18 AM
  5. Howdy Dave
    By linniec in forum Epilepsy
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 05-13-2012, 04:33 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


BTC Inc's Disclaimer and Privacy Policy

The material on this site is for information & support purposes only, and is not a substitute for medical advice provided by a licensed health care provider. Always consult your doctor before trying anything that you find online.