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    A very interesting article. The Doctor with MS apparently had not reached the stage where fatigue was a factor when she wanted to go to Medical School to be an Internist. I wonder if later in the progression of her disease if she may have felt the course given to her was maybe a better choice. She did go on to do well and to contribute in a positive way. Or maybe she was one of the lucky ones who never have experienced fatigue with her MS.

    I have to be totally honest, I would not at all mind a person in a wheelchair being my Doctor. It might help them to be empathetic. However, having MS and knowing that in most cases it progresses as we have it longer and most people have really bad or off days I am not sure I would want that. JMO!
    Virginia

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    Virginia, I haven't seen the article yet (the NY Times limits the number of page views per month, and I've reached the limit but as soon as that changes, I'll get to it) but the doctor who was my PCP for over 20 years had a problem with her leg and scooted around the office in a 3-legged stool on wheels. I had no problem with that. She was doing a great job.

    And once I went to a legal aid lawyer who was a young woman with post-polio syndrome who was in a wheelchair. She did an excellent job--and again, I had no problem with her wheelchair.

    But sadly some of us with MS tend to think we can do more than we really can do. I know I'm often one of them--because for a while I actually can do whatever it is. I forget that I give out after half an hour or 2 hours or whatever. Also,I can't predict when I'm going to give out. The more physical the activity, the sooner I give out. That's the only thing I can say for sure about it.

    I'm far less likely to give out sitting here and typing than if I tried to do a fair amount of vacuuming, for instance.

    A doctor might have similar problems, might find weird symptoms coming on very suddenly just when things seemed to be going along OK. I can imagine a doctor who would suddenly start dropping things, or eyesight would fail, or there might even be a sudden dizzy spell--and these episodes could happen at very bad times.

    I know what you mean.
    MS diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2002-2005. Copaxone 6/07 - 5/10.
    Member of this MS board since 2001.

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    Quote Originally Posted by agate View Post
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    Virginia, I haven't seen the article yet (the NY Times limits the number of page views per month, and I've reached the limit but as soon as that changes, I'll get to it) but the doctor who was my PCP for over 20 years had a problem with her leg and scooted around the office in a 3-legged stool on wheels. I had no problem with that. She was doing a great job.

    And once I went to a legal aid lawyer who was a young woman with post-polio syndrome who was in a wheelchair. She did an excellent job--and again, I had no problem with her wheelchair.

    But sadly some of us with MS tend to think we can do more than we really can do. I know I'm often one of them--because for a while I actually can do whatever it is. I forget that I give out after half an hour or 2 hours or whatever. Also,I can't predict when I'm going to give out. The more physical the activity, the sooner I give out. That's the only thing I can say for sure about it.

    I'm far less likely to give out sitting here and typing than if I tried to do a fair amount of vacuuming, for instance.

    A doctor might have similar problems, might find weird symptoms coming on very suddenly just when things seemed to be going along OK. I can imagine a doctor who would suddenly start dropping things, or eyesight would fail, or there might even be a sudden dizzy spell--and these episodes could happen at very bad times.

    I know what you mean.
    Interesting. Do people with MS have issues with dizzy spells when they are fatigued a lot? I'v seen dizzy spells from fatigue happen to people with strokes (http://cripvideoproductions.com/astrokeofendurance.php see around 17 moment mark) so I was just curious when I read your post.
    Mild Spastic Diplegia Cerebral Palsy and bad proprioception.
    My website for my original short films! http://cripvideoproductions.com/cripsnotcreeps.php

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    So cool! Thanks! Here's one about a doc with Cerebral Palsy I found awhile ago https://www.gillettechildrens.org/kh...with-knowledge
    Mild Spastic Diplegia Cerebral Palsy and bad proprioception.
    My website for my original short films! http://cripvideoproductions.com/cripsnotcreeps.php

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    Funnylegs, some MS people have dizzy spells when they are fatigued, some have them even when they are not fatigued and some don't have them at all. But some people have cognitive problems also, especially when they are fatigued. There are many other problems that we have that would keep me from wanting my personal Doctor to have MS.
    Virginia

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    Quote Originally Posted by Virginia View Post
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    Funnylegs, some MS people have dizzy spells when they are fatigued, some have them even when they are not fatigued and some don't have them at all. But some people have cognitive problems also, especially when they are fatigued. There are many other problems that we have that would keep me from wanting my personal Doctor to have MS.
    Wow, I never realized being dizzy could be a MS symptom! Thanks. As agate pointed out it probably depends on the person. With CP some people look and function close to what an able bodied person can do, and others cannot even move or swallow. I don't have MS but seeing that it is a nervous system condition like CP, and every nervous system is different I can see how some people with MS can be doctors and others would find the profession impossible. For some I would think some very minor disability accommodations could be provided by law in the U.S but I'm not entirely sure.
    Mild Spastic Diplegia Cerebral Palsy and bad proprioception.
    My website for my original short films! http://cripvideoproductions.com/cripsnotcreeps.php

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    I know a doc in my area that has had “mild MS” for 20 years and was excellent. Doc had to retire last year with a big attack.

    MS can be so mild as to not impact an ability to practice.

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    A lot depends on the person's ability to judge what he/she is capable of. Most doctors are probably skilled at this though there are some who aren't. And MS is so unpredictable that it's exceptionally difficult to know just how much effort you're up to.

    But I would think that many medical providers could go on with their work in spite of MS so long as the MS isn't seriously getting in their way.
    MS diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2002-2005. Copaxone 6/07 - 5/10.
    Member of this MS board since 2001.

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    I met a Doctor at University of North Carolina who had MS. She worked as radiology specialist. She talked with me quite a bit, but confessed to having her problems. She was working part-time.

    I proved to myself this afternoon that I would not want to have anyone's health in my hands. I was on the phone with technician from cable company trying to fix my e-mail which is not working for over two hours and I promise you when I hung up I could hardly think. E-mail is still not working. I don't think my brain has kicked back in either. Maybe it just doesn't work all that well anyway.
    Virginia

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