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Thread: heart health and meds

  1. #1
    Distinguished Community Member houghchrst's Avatar
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    Angry heart health and meds

    My podiatrist prescribed me Ibuprofen 800 mg 3x a day. I asked him if taking that much would harm my liver or kidneys and got a big fat NO. So I am online doing research right after I had my heart attack and I had not gone back to the ibuprofen, just had a feeling, and find a small bit on nsaids contributing to heart attacks. So now I am down to 800 mg maybe twice a week. It does take the edge off. Today doing more research I find this interesting tidbit. Guess I should have checked this sooner. I was so worried about what it would do to my kidneys and liver I forgot about one of the most important organs, the heart. quick easy read

    https://www.health.harvard.edu/heart...or-your-heart-

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  3. #2
    Distinguished Community Member jingle's Avatar
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    hmmmmmmm --- Maybe a year or two my GP forbid me taking any Ibuprofen. Already I could not take any aspirin (My precious Excedrin!!!!) because of macular (sp?) degeneration in both eyes.

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    Distinguished Community Member houghchrst's Avatar
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    Looks like I don't have many choices out there. Going for the CBD caps.


    Opioids Raise Deadly Heart Risks for Some

    Much of the risk for early death was related to cardiovascular complications, not overdoses

    From the WebMD Archives By Alan Mozes
    HealthDay Reporter
    TUESDAY, June 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- While the dangers of overdose among patients prescribed powerful opioid painkillers such as Oxycontin and fentanyl are well known, a new study found unexpected heart risks with the medications.
    Patients who had just been prescribed an opioid painkiller had a 64 percent higher risk of early death when compared to patients who were given an alternative pain medication. But much of that increased risk was related to the onset of breathing difficulties during sleep, followed by heart rhythm irregularities and other cardiovascular complications.
    "We were not surprised by the increased risk for overdose deaths, which is well known," noted study author Wayne Ray, from the department of health policy at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine in Nashville, Tenn.
    "However, the large increase in cardiovascular death risk is a novel finding," Ray said. "[And] it suggests being even more cautious with opioids for patients who are at high cardiovascular risk, such as those who have had a heart attack or have diabetes."
    In the study, the team analyzed data collected between 1999 and 2012 on nearly 23,000 patients, average age 48, who had just been prescribed a long-acting opioid medication. The researchers compared that to data on an equal number of patients who had been given an alternate pain medication.
    The alternate medications included anticonvulsants such as Neurontin (gabapentin), Lyrica (pregabalin) and Tegretol (carbamazepine) and low-dose antidepressants. Anticonvulsants are used to control seizures, bipolar disorder and/or nerve pain.
    During an average tracking period of about four to six months, there were 185 deaths in the opioid group versus 87 deaths in the alternate medication group.
    In all, the opioid group was found to face a 64 percent increased risk of death due to any reason, the team found.
    But the opioid patients also faced a 65 percent increased risk of death specifically related to new heart complications, the findings showed.
    The study authors concluded that alternate pain medications should be favored over long-acting opioids whenever possible, particularly for those patients who have a history of heart disease, heart attack or diabetes.

    "Our opinion, which is consistent with the recent guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, is that opioids should be used as a last resort," said Ray. "The best way to decide if the benefits outweigh the risks is through a careful practitioner-patient discussion."
    Dr. Joseph Frank is an assistant professor of medicine in the division of general internal medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. He cautioned that while "we have learned a great deal about the risks of opioid medications in recent years, [we] still have a long way to go."
    And, he added, "There may be patients for whom the improvement in function due to opioids outweighs the modest risk found in this study, but this balance is often challenging to assess and communicate to patients, particularly in busy primary care settings."
    Frank, who is also a general internist at the VA Medical Center in Denver, agreed that non-opioid pain treatment is preferable when possible.
    But since the study focused exclusively on the risks faced by first-time opioid users, he stressed the need for more research to assess the risks faced by those trying to kick a long-term opioid habit, "as this transition can be very difficult, and may actually increase risk of some adverse events for some patients."
    Ray and his team published their findings June 14 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.
    WebMD News from HealthDay

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  7. #4
    Distinguished Community Member Sherman Peabody's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by houghchrst View Post
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    My podiatrist prescribed me Ibuprofen 800 mg 3x a day. I asked him if taking that much would harm my liver or kidneys and got a big fat NO. So I am online doing research right after I had my heart attack and I had not gone back to the ibuprofen, just had a feeling, and find a small bit on nsaids contributing to heart attacks. So now I am down to 800 mg maybe twice a week. It does take the edge off. Today doing more research I find this interesting tidbit. Guess I should have checked this sooner. I was so worried about what it would do to my kidneys and liver I forgot about one of the most important organs, the heart. quick easy read

    https://www.health.harvard.edu/heart...or-your-heart-
    Even 800 mg is A LOT. Based on my own experience (I only take it when I absolutely HAVE to), 2400 mg is probably dangerous. At that point you're probably better off switching to something else. You were very wise to be suspicious. Lately I've taken to cutting the 800s I have in half, and taking a half every 6 hours, instead, just to be safe.

    always,

    sp
    Last edited by Sherman Peabody; 12-05-2017 at 03:35 PM.

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  9. #5
    Distinguished Community Member Earth Mother 2 Angels's Avatar
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    ((((((houghchrst)))))) ~

    A close friend developed bleeding ulcers from Ibuprofen, then her RA/PA pharmaceutical exacerbated that, in addition to giving her urethral cancer. She was hospitalized for a couple of weeks and needed blood transfusions.

    Jim is forbidden to take Advil. He's anemic from cancer and chemo. But it's so hard on the liver and kidneys that he would be at risk of metastasis in those organs if he took Advil.

    CBD and THC have no adverse side effects, and no one has ever died of an overdose from either one of them. This is your safest course of medication, in my opinion. In January, Jim was gray, gaunt and on his last legs. Today, he's buff, rosy cheeked, and living life normally, even with cancer. We just ordered a couple of pairs of pants and a belt to fit his expanded waistline. He has a voracious appetite. And no pain. He is in good spirits, happy, and vital. He is literally living proof that CBD/THC work. His oncologist said he wouldn't be here for Christmas, and yet, here he is.

    If you can, please wean yourself off of the 800 mg of Ibuprofen you're still taking and increase your CBD oil. You can't risk damaging your heart or another heart attack by taking Ibuprofen. And drink lots of water, up to 32 oz/day to clean out your system. This is important, so please try to drink as much water as you can through the day/evening. Switch to decaf. No soft drinks.

    Please read the labels on the packaged or processed food you purchase to keep track of your sodium intake. We all eat way too much sodium. And that contributes to high blood pressure. And dairy products can contribute to pain, so keep cheese, milk, ice cream, etc. at a bare minimum. Once again, I recommend that you check out the recipes on Forks over Knives. I think you'll be surprised how tasty and wonderful these meals are.

    We are what we eat. Changing your diet will make you feel better. I guarantee it, because I've got RA/PA, and it's basically under control, even at my age, despite all that I put my body through daily.

    Exercise will make you feel better too, so if you explore some gentle forms of exercise, like QiGong and Tai Kwan Do, you might discover that it helps your pain, as well as your mood and spirit.

    The answers to healing our bodies are not in a pill. The answers are in the way we care for our bodies, nourish our bodies, our minds and souls, so that we don't need to take pills. The Earth provides us with natural healing agents, eg. CBD oil, THC, flax seed oil, spearmint, witch hazel, etc. Pills just try to mimic those essences chemically.

    I recommend a holistic approach to healing your heart and health. It's a new journey for you. Take the right steps forward. Think outside the box. Explore new ways of healing.

    Many healing prayers on the way for you ~

    Love & Light,



    Rose
    Mom to Jon, 48, (seizure disorder; Gtube; trache; colostomy; osteoporosis; hypothyroid; enlarged prostate; lymphedema, assorted mysteries) and Michael, 32, (intractable seizures; Gtube), who were born with an undiagnosed progressive neuromuscular disease and courageous spirits. Our Angel Michael received his wings in 2003 and now resides in Heaven. Our Angel Jon lives at home with me and Jim, the world's most wonderful dad.

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  11. #6
    Distinguished Community Member houghchrst's Avatar
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    rose your husbands progress is wonderful and as for the meds I agree. I have already contacted my caregivers and they will be making me CBD oil. I have printed out basic needs for a heart healthy pantry and already have cut out all red meat except for ground beef once in a while. Eating more veggies, cutting back on salt except for my daily dose of a bit of pink salt under my tongue. Making sure I am on my feet more and moving my legs when I am sitting for a short time. using legs in my rocker. Read in an article about blood pooling in legs and not getting to heart properly and moving to keep legs active. Have an exercise bungee chair for strength and core strengthing.

    My biggest issue is smoking. I feel so mentally and emotionally sick that this is so very hard and I cry on and off all day because of it and my fear. I know I need to use that fear to quit. Krikey I think having a heart attack is kinda hitting bottom. Last time I quit smoking I put post it notes all through my house with reasons on them to quit smoking. People thought it was a bit extreme lol but it worked for me. If it wasn't so cold out I would be outside more but my monitor says to watch for extreme temperatures.

    I did go out on the last warm day we had last weekend and put up outdoor christmas stuff. So of course the wind has been horrible for a couple days and blew everything over I had to go out and shut everything off and wait until we have a non windy day.

    does anybody besides me think that we are having windier days than we did even a few years ago.

    the link you sent me rose I did take seriously. I will keep going back to it to try to remind myself to be mindful of what I eat. The recipes sound good. I need to do some serious shopping. Shortcake is going to be hard to wean off of the snack foods, prepared stuff like chicken nuggets, pizza rolls, pot pies, the quick microwave meals. I quit cooking because of increased pain in my legs in my feet. I pay for every step. Now I am paying for every moment over the last two years that I sat on my butt thinking I was averting back pain. Losing weight by just not eating. I know that is bad. I have already printed out a couple of recipes and it may take some doing but I will work on it. I hate frickin' sweet potatoes lolol. I don't favor squash much either but I know that after you try something so many times you get a taste for it.

    Here's one for those out there considering CBD but have heart issues.

    https://420evaluationsonline.com/hea...tions-answered


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  13. #7
    Distinguished Community Member houghchrst's Avatar
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    Just ordered two Forks Over Knives books off of ebay. Paid a whole eight dollars. Thanks Rose I look forward to getting them.

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  15. #8
    Distinguished Community Member houghchrst's Avatar
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    Gotta ask myself which is the lesser of two evils. Looking up american pain society. How did I not know there was one lol.

    https://www.practicalpainmanagement....ain-save-heart

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  17. #9
    Distinguished Community Member houghchrst's Avatar
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    Study: Marijuana Use Associated With Decreased In-Hospital Mortality In Heart Failure Patients


    Tuesday, 21 November 2017
    Bergenfield, NJ: Heart failure patients with a history of cannabis use possess reduced odds of in-hospital mortality compared to similarly matched controls, according to data published online in the journal Circulation.
    Investigators assessed data from over six million heart failure patients over a seven-year period. Patients with a history of cannabis use were less likely to suffer from atrial fibrillation (irregular heartbeat), experienced shorter hospital stays, and were less likely to die during hospitalization as compared to non-users.
    "Our study showed that cannabis use lowered the odds of atrial fibrillation in patients with heart failure," authors concluded. "There was also reduced in-hospital mortality among patients admitted for the primary diagnosis of heart failure in DU (cannabis dependent users) and NDU (non-dependent cannabis users) which was not explained by comorbid conditions and demographic data. This study provides important opportunity to explore the preventive mechanism of cannabis on atrial fibrillation and its therapeutic potential in heart failure patients."
    Prior studies have similarly reported increased survival rates among marijuana-positive patients hospitalized for trauma, TBI (traumatic brain injury), and heart attacks.




    https://norml.org/news/2017/11/21/st...ilure-patients

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