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Thread: Adaptive chopping rolling counter?

  1. #1
    Distinguished Community Member BBS1951's Avatar
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    Default Adaptive chopping rolling counter?

    Until I get my accessible kitchen in a year, it would be so nice to have a small table low enough for a wheelchair, which I could roll into the kitchen, pull up to and chop up and prep for cooking supper. For under a few hundred bucks.

    I would put it in the kitchen and stow it away after Use. That way I would be by all my utensils, pantry and fridge.

    It would have to be sturdy enough to withstand chopping on, and low enough so that I am chopping at a level about the waist level, or a smidge lower. But it canít be too heavy, else it would be hard to move. Butcher block would take up too much room.

    I have been looking on line, but so far, canít find the right cart.

    Do you have something like it?

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  3. #2
    Distinguished Community Member agate's Avatar
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    An adjustable-height rolling table with drawers would be great. I don't know of any but over the years I've been through more than one rolling table pretty much like this one:

    https://www.amazon.com/Rolling-Adjus.../dp/B0115OEKPK

    One that I had for years was spring-loaded and worked well. It was sturdier than the one in the link above.

    Lately I've been using a flimsier wood one. It's not so good for kitchen use but I don't do cooking that involves any preparation. I'll prepare broccoli or cauliflower or the odd potato or squash but those are fast enough jobs, and if I'm not up to it one day, I'll try to be up to it the next day.

    It's really hard to find a rolling adjustable table that is just right, I think, and I've never seen one with drawers. I went from a flimsy metal one to a much better hospital-type one, and now I'm on this wood one that is really meant as a reading table. I use it mainly as a catchall or as an endtable I can put wherever I want. When I need more space, I roll it under the bed so that it looks like an over-the-bed table, which it can also be, of course.

    I looked for a photo of it online but apparently it's not being sold any more. I've had it for about 25 years.
    MS diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2002-2005. Copaxone 6/07 - 5/10.
    Member of this MS board since 2001.

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  5. #3
    Distinguished Community Member Earth Mother 2 Angels's Avatar
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    Question

    ((((((BBS)))))) ~

    Would an over the bed tray table work?

    https://www.google.com/search?biw=19....0.Gw06jHoMXVk

    If that link doesn't work, Google "over the bed tray table" and then click on more images to see the types of trays available.

    It's not a kitchen item, but it might serve the purpose temporarily for you.

    Love & Light,

    Rose
    Mom to Jon, 48, (seizure disorder; Gtube; trache; colostomy; osteoporosis; hypothyroid; enlarged prostate; lymphedema, assorted mysteries) and Michael, 32, (intractable seizures; Gtube), who were born with an undiagnosed progressive neuromuscular disease and courageous spirits. Our Angel Michael received his wings in 2003 and now resides in Heaven. Our Angel Jon lives at home with me and Jim, the world's most wonderful dad.

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    Distinguished Community Member agate's Avatar
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    Maybe my link didn't work. It should show something similar. I guess my post wasn't clear. Over-the-bed tray tables, adjustable in height, have been what I used all along--anywhere inside this place. Kitchen, bedroom, living room--it's been convenient anywhere. If you get all your kitchen things together--cutting board, knife, washed fresh veggies, and a bag for the peelings, etc.--you can sit in the living room or dining area if there isn't room for this table in your kitchen.

    At least that's what I used to do.
    MS diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2002-2005. Copaxone 6/07 - 5/10.
    Member of this MS board since 2001.

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  9. #5
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    I know we talked about this at least once before. Mmcc (?) had some good tips. I'll try to find it.

    Edited to add this thread from the archives. I didn't have the eyes tonight to read it all. Enjoy old friends along w the tips.

    http://www.braintalkcommunities.org/...highlight=mmcc

    ANN
    Last edited by stillstANNding; 11-07-2017 at 06:51 PM.
    There comes a time when silence is betrayal.- MLK

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  11. #6
    Distinguished Community Member nuthatch's Avatar
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    Just an observation about over-the-bed tables. Notice that on most of them, the base does not allow you to pull up very far under them in a wheelchair. In the link Rose provided, there is one showing a woman seated in a wheelchair with a table pulled up that she is writing at. That table has a U-shaped base which allows room for her feet. It is pictured several times in that collection of pictures, but appears to be the only one with that type of base. I have that particular table. It adjusts up and down to whatever level you need and it is on wheels. The problem is that the tabletop is made of plastic and is not very sturdy for kitchen work. If you could find a small drafting table or desk that has that shape of base and is height adjustable or the right height for what you need, I imagine casters could be added. Just a thought.

    I googled "wheelchair drafting table". Believe it or not, there are such things! Here's one that folds flat for storage too! But at $349, it's pretty pricey.
    https://www.staples.com/Alvin-and-Co...E&gclsrc=aw.ds

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  13. #7
    Distinguished Community Member BBS1951's Avatar
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    These are intriguing, especially thread from BT archives. When I get home from doc visit today, will study them.

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  15. #8
    Distinguished Community Member BBS1951's Avatar
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    One idea on the MMCC thread is a wheelchair with rising seat for counter work. Do they make em for manual chairs, or only for power chairs?

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  17. #9
    Distinguished Community Member nuthatch's Avatar
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    Elevating seats are an option on power chairs. And Medicare won't pay for them. The first one I had was paid for by private insurance, but the new power wheelchair I got through Medicare, I had to pay out of pocket for the elevating feature. Pricey!

    I did find this elevating manual ultralight wheelchair. It elevates, but it appears the seat is not level. I would slide right out into a puddle on the floor!
    http://www.medicaleshop.com/pdg-elev...heelchair.html


    There are such things as standing manual or power wheelchairs, that take you from a sitting to standing position.
    https://www.wheelchair88.com/product...iAAEgLzQPD_BwE

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  19. #10
    Distinguished Community Member BBS1951's Avatar
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    Thanks, yes it looks like one would slide right out!

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