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Thread: Article on Rituxan vs. Ocrevus

  1. #1
    Distinguished Community Member agate's Avatar
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    Default Article on Rituxan vs. Ocrevus

    This article, "Despite Rituximab's Promise in Neurology, Roche Focuses on Ocrelizumab," came to my attention. The Website--the Center for Biosimilars--is unfamiliar to me but its contributors are people with mainstream credentials. Though the article covers ground that has been discussed here before, it also mentions the upcoming ECTRIMS conference (Paris, October 25-28) at which the pharmaceutical giant Roche--owners of Genentech, which makes these two drugs--will be presenting a mountain of evidence in favor of Ocrevus:

    http://www.centerforbiosimilars.com/...on-ocrelizumab
    Last edited by agate; 10-20-2017 at 08:22 PM.
    MS diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2002-2005. Copaxone 6/07 - 5/10.
    Member of this MS board since 2001.

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    Distinguished Community Member Howie's Avatar
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    1.9 billion in sales in 2016. For not QUITE, a cure. There's too much money involved to ever announce a cure....IMHO.
    Roswell was a gift.

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    Distinguished Community Member Cherie's Avatar
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    Both Rituxan and Ocrevus are made by Genentech. They are identical drugs with the exception that Rituxan is a mouse model of monoclonal antibody and Ocrevus is the humanized model. It is thought that the humanized model will trigger fewer side effects of a negative nature. Both are close to the same annual cost. I have been on Rituxan now for a little over three years and it is very easy to take with few (if any) negative side effects yet I do feel like the progression I have seen over the past three or four years has slowed. My infusion center bills for $37,000/infusion but gets reimbursed at a rate of about $23,000 per infusion. At that rate it costs about $92,000 for Rituxan, $100,000 for Ocrevus, $140 for Lemtrada (alemtuzumab) and $123,000 for Rebif. Ocrevus and Rituxan show a higher efficacy than Rebif with a lower annual cost. I no longer think that finding a cure is primary but what is important is slowing and maybe even reversing progression. The newer drugs of ocrelizumab and alemtuzumab are more cost effective (because they only have to be given for a minimal time) so the overall cost of therap y is lower.
    Last edited by Cherie; 10-20-2017 at 07:42 PM.

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    Distinguished Community Member BBS1951's Avatar
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    There was research showing Biotin is as effective as Ocrevus. It’s an otc supplement also known as B7

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    Distinguished Community Member agate's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BBS1951 View Post
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    There was research showing Biotin is as effective as Ocrevus. Itís an otc supplement also known as B7
    Would you happen to know more about that research? A link, maybe?
    MS diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2002-2005. Copaxone 6/07 - 5/10.
    Member of this MS board since 2001.

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  11. #6
    Distinguished Community Member Cherie's Avatar
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    That research is still not complete to my knowledge as there are several phase III trials ongoing with Biotin. It has been found so far (according to a presentation I attended in May at the Consortium of MS Centers) to take an average of 6-8 months before the person taking it notices any change in the way they feel or function. In the high recommended dosing of 300 mg per day in three divided doses of 100mg each, it is not available over the Counter as the highest commercial dosage is 10 mg capsules. If one wants to try it, there are several compounding pharmacies that sell it in 100 mg capsules. at www.metabiome.com it costs about $40 for a 30 day supply.

    That said, it does have side effects that may be troublesome. Diarrhea is common in more than half of those who take it including urgent stool incontinence as a result. It can also give false positive or negative lab results as biotin has long been used in reagents used to do some of the most common labs. Glucose is one of the false positives that are affected. A person with a normal blood sugar can have a reading 3-4x normal levels leading to a suggestion of diabetes or indication that diabetes in not well managed.

    I have taken Biotin for several months and was never able to get to the 300 mg/day as the diarrhea was so bad even starting with one 100mg capsule daily. It also, for three months , gave lab results of blood sugars in the 300-400 range (normal is 70-106) . It was good I was keeping track with home monitoring as glucometer test strips do not seem to be impacted by this supplement. Home monitoring showed my levels to be almost always within normal limits and A1C levels actually dropped a bit while I was taking it.

    All this is said to caution one from starting it without realizing some of the ramifications. It is not a benign supplement in this dosage. Not sure where the research is that shows it effective as Ocrevus. I have looked and can't seem to find it but I do know that at the Consortium meeting they said they were probably 2-3 years from publishing findings on this as a treatment for progressive forms of MS.

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  13. #7
    Distinguished Community Member BBS1951's Avatar
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    I read it a while back, but can’t find it which is frustrating. I don’t know if I had posted it here.

    Re Rituxan vs Ocrevus, wheelchair kamikaze wrote good column on it.

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  15. #8
    Distinguished Community Member BBS1951's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BBS1951 View Post
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    There was research showing Biotin is as effective as Ocrevus. It’s an otc supplement also known as B7
    Beginning to doubt memory. Perhaps was Lipoic acid that outperformed Ocrevus. Was either Lipoic or Biotin.

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  17. #9
    Distinguished Community Member SuzE-Q's Avatar
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    Just brought up the thread for you.

    http://www.braintalkcommunities.org/...formed-Ocrevus

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  19. #10
    Distinguished Community Member BBS1951's Avatar
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    Thanks Suze! Yes, was Lipoic, not Biotin that outperformed Ocrevus!

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