NeuroscienceNews.com
March 9, 2016

A worldwide team of senior scientists and clinicians have come together to produce an editorial which indicates that certain microbes – a specific virus and two specific types of bacteria
– are major causes of Alzheimer’s Disease. Their paper, which has been published online in the highly regarded peer-reviewed journal, Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, stresses the urgent need
for further research – and more importantly, for clinical trials of anti-microbial and related agents to treat the disease.

This major call for action is based on substantial published evidence into Alzheimer’s. The team’s landmark editorial summarises the abundant data implicating these microbes, but until now this work has been largely ignored or dismissed as controversial – despite the absence of evidence to the contrary. Therefore, proposals for the funding of clinical trials have been refused, despite the fact that over 400 unsuccessful clinical trials for Alzheimer’s based on other concepts were carried out over a recent 10-year period.

Opposition to the microbial concepts resembles the fierce resistance to studies some years ago which showed that viruses cause certain types of cancer, and that a bacterium causes stomach ulcers. Those concepts were ultimately proved valid, leading to successful clinical trials and the subsequent development of appropriate treatments.

Professor Douglas Kell of The University of Manchester’s School of Chemistry and Manchester Institute of Biotechnology is one of the editorial’s authors. He says that supposedly sterile red blood cells were seen to contain dormant microbes, which also has implications for blood transfusions.

“We are saying there is incontrovertible evidence that Alzheimer’s Disease has a dormant microbial component, and that this can be woken up by iron dysregulation. Removing this iron will slow down or prevent cognitive degeneration – we can’t keep ignoring all of the evidence,” Professor Douglas Kell said.

Professor Resia Pretorius of the University of Pretoria, who worked with Douglas Kell on the editorial, said “The microbial presence in blood may also play a fundamental role as causative agent of systemic inflammation, which is a characteristic of Alzheimer’s disease – particularly, the bacterial cell wall component and endotoxin, lipopolysaccharide. Furthermore, there is ample evidence that this can cause neuroinflammation and amyloid-β plaque formation.”

The findings of this editorial could also have implications for the future treatment of Parkinson’s Disease, and other progressive neurological conditions.

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This makes total and complete sense to me. I immediately connected it to the chickenpox/shingles correlation. The possible causes of AD listed in this article are definitely appropriate to my husband. my husband was diagnosed with age related dementia/AD in June 2012 by mri (at age 80, when he was still actively pastoring a church). He had had several mri over a period of years showing progressive plaque build up with some symptomatology. after major open heart surgery in may 2013 there was a major change in his status mentally for the worse and with a slow downhill slide, along with physical weakening, such as in his balance & hearing, even tho he now exercised on a regular basis – something he had not done in more than 30 years. as of January 2016, he is now on dialysis, with another drop in mental status. He lost a sister diagnosed with AD in april 2015 at the age of 95 and has a sister with mild dementia who just reached the age of 99. We did almost not accept going on the dialysis due to the AD, even knowing it would have meant imminent death. Living with this disease on a daily basis, the current ‘meds’ for it are worse than the disease itself, are too expensive, & many times of no use. We need to find a way to stop this disease. these clinical trials must be funded. The treatments are there for us to find & are probably already on our shelves right now.

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In the editorial of the Journal of Alzheimer Disease , published in 8 March 2016 with the title “MICROBES AND ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE”,the dozens of prestigeous researchers of prestigeous universtities in dozens of countries around the world that wrote the milestone text of it very interesting editorial , agree that herpes simplex virus type 1 , Chlamydia pneumoniae, and several types of spirochaete (as Borrelia of Lyme disease) , fungal infections,etc. can be related as some triggers (but NOT as causes) of Alzheimer disease.Extra Virgin Coconut Oil is empirically used as mitochondrial function improver and as alternative fuel to the brain in AD and others dementias , still without scientific foundation, but with hundreds of empirical testimonies by patients , caregivers and relatives of patients that gives some improve in dementias as AD.

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The findings that AD has a microbial etiology is indeed a significant finding. Microbiologists can possibly try using probiotics for the prevention and treatment of AD. Recent research outputs have shown that the human intestinal microbiome composition plays an important role in orchestrating the overall health and well-being of an individual. Probiotics have already been used for the prevention of certain nutritional deficiencies, hyperlipidemia, colorectal cancer and hopefully even diabetes.

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This may be a situation where the infecting/offending organism does the damage to start the process in motion and once established antimicrobial therapy is not effective. Examples include Hepatitis C or B virus where treated early causes limited liver damage but over time may lead to cirrhosis or liver cancer. At that later time treating the virus is too late. Trials might want to focus on very early AD or better yet if one can make the definite link between an organism and AD treat before symptoms develop. As a microbiologist I believe it warrants much more study.

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Two Spriochetal Infections

- Borrelia spirochetes ( Blood and Tissue pathogens) Transmitted by insect bites
- Treponemal spirochetes from the oral cavity (Periodontal disease pathogens)

are linked to Alzheimer’s Disease pathogenesis.

I offer in support of the Chronic Borrelia spirochete brain infections in Alzheimer’s disease, the following two links to lectures which describe images of the
Borrelia in Autopsy Alzheimer’s Brain tissue from the Harvard Medical School Brain Bank.

Link:; Original 37 min Powerpoint without narration:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/nthxi50btu...tion.pptx?dl=0

Link:: Video with Narration 44 min.:
Final Lecture German Borreliosis Society Alan B MacDonald Lecture March 11 2016

Borrelia brain infections provide the most Photographic documentation of The Cause of Alzheimer’s Disease, as proven by direct Photographs of these microbes by DNA probe imaging
in autopsy Alzheimer’s disease Brains.

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This is an interesting article. I think fundings for the clinical trials should be instituted in other to proof or disproof this relationship between infection and AD. There have been many funded clinical trials on AD and other concepts which showed little or no evidence. So I see no reason why this concept should not also be funded for clinical trials. For as realised, the most promising concepts are always initially rejected, and they only come to realise that many years later. For example, the idea of the scientist who said peptic ulcer was caused by a bacterium was rejected until he had to proved it himself by drinking a cork-tail of the bacterium which is not suppose to be that way.

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This may be a situation where the infecting/offending organism does the damage to start the process in motion and once established antimicrobial therapy is not effective. Examples include Hepatitis C or B virus where treated early causes limited liver damage but over time may lead to cirrhosis or liver cancer. At that later time treating the virus is too late. Trials might want to focus on very early AD or better yet if one can make the definite link between an organism and AD treat before symptoms develop. As a microbiologist I believe it warrants much more study.

http://neurosciencenews.com/microbes...eurology-3826/