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Thread: Psychedelics and MS

  1. #1
    Distinguished Community Member Sherman Peabody's Avatar
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    Default Psychedelics and MS

    I was recently introduced to an alternative health care clinic in Mexico. I was shocked to find out they've treated over 750 patients suffering from MS using ibogaine!

    I spoke with a 43 year old women who takes a flood dose of ibogaine immediately after feeling the onset of an exacerbation. She says it stops her relapses dead in their tracks,
    and she's taken ibogaine at least once a year for the last 22 years.

    Another man claims to have thrown his wheel chair in the garbage after his first time using 5-MEO-DMT. He says the psychedelic trip taught him a new way to use his legs.

    Again.. 750+ patients have used this, just in this one clinic in Mexico.

    The clinic's chief of staff says he's used COCKTAILS of several different psychedelic medicines for treatment of not just multiple sclerosis, but on a myriad of different neurological
    diseases with great results. They regularly use - ibogaine, DMT, ayahuasca, peyote, magic mushrooms, and occasionally LSD.

    -WarmOutToday

    http://www.thisisms.com/forum/natura...opic24133.html

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    Some evidence suggests that the neurodegeneration in Parkinson’s may be caused by the body’s own immune system losing the ability to determine between healthy and unhealthy cells, as is the case with autoimmune diseases such as Fibromyalgia, Multiple Sclerosis and others, in which much of the body’s organs and cell tissue deteriorate because of misdirected attack by the immune system.

    Although the theory is still untested, there is anecdotal evidence and a theoretical framework that suggests ibogaine may have therapeutic benefits in the treatment of Parkinson, and possibly other disorders that cause the degeneration of brain and cell tissues.

    Ibogaine therapy, especially low-dose regimens, may facilitate the expression of GDNF without the side effects of other medications or the difficulty of other avenues of administering neurotrophic factor. Anecdotal reports suggest that at least several people with Fibromyalgia, Multiple Sclerosis, and Parkinson’s who have been treated with ibogaine have seen an extended remission of symptoms.

    https://www.ibogainealliance.org/ibo...py/parkinsons/
    Last edited by Sherman Peabody; 10-06-2017 at 02:39 AM.

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  3. #2
    Distinguished Community Member Howie's Avatar
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    MS is a trip without adding psychedelics.

    There is a sort of logic to using something that stimulates brain cells, but it would be totally without direction as to which cells were stimulated.

    Most of the chemicals you named are totally organic which would be a good thing. But how would the dose and effect you are looking for be decided? To simply stimulate brain cells without seeing flying horses and talking cows?

    If there is benefit, it will have to be decided how much and how often, and in what form. If it were ever to be a legit form of treatment, there would need to be much research done.
    Roswell was a gift.

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  5. #3
    Distinguished Community Member Sherman Peabody's Avatar
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    I took a small amount MDMA and I could do things I couldn’t before. For about 5 hours I could stand long enough to have a conversation without having to find a seat. I could dance for
    an entire song. It was rather amazing. I checked out the side effects and they list possible neurological impairment which I have ALL THE TIME!!

    I had [some] fears about trying [MDMA], but after 23 years of every activity in my life being hard I said f*** it! And I am glad I did. I decided life is so short and I don’t know how long I will be walking around on my own. This year I got my first wheel chair and although it is wonderful for getting around it is still a wheel chair! It is not legal and I know the person well that gets me the drug so not a lot of fear of getting crap. I have been getting the same effect every time but have only been using it for about 6-8 months two to three times a week. This stuff is amazing, I can walk up a fight of stairs, better yet I can run! Personally unless someone tells me that it is going to kill me, I am going to keep taking 5 hours vacations from this crappy disease.

    -angela351

    https://shift.ms/forums/topic/mdma-m...ay-for-5-hours

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    Clare Hodges, also known as Elizabeth Brice, was an English activist who advanced the medical understanding of cannabis and campaigned for its widespread benefit as a therapeutic medicine in the United Kingdom. Clare Hodges is the pseudonym that Elizabeth Brice used, Clare being her middle name and Hodges her mother's maiden name.

    She was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS) at age 26 but it was nearly 10 years before she tried cannabis to alleviate the symptoms. Hodges found that cannabis greatly alleviated
    her condition. It was this that motivated her to become an avid cannabis rights campaigner.

    Consequently, Hodges founded the Alliance for Cannabis Therapeutics (ACT) in 1992 with two other patients. The ACT worked to provide advice and assistance to other MS suffers and individuals with other medical conditions which might benefit from the use of cannabis.

    Hodges took the matter to the House of Lords in 1998 where she spoke about the benefits she had found from the therapeutic use of this illicit drug. She stated "Cannabis helps my body relax. I function and move much easier. The physical effects are very clear. It is not just a vague feeling of well-being".

    Despite the backing of several members of the House of Lords, and Austin Mitchell MP, the ACT was unable to change the law in the UK with regards to the use of cannabis. Hodges later went on to join the Board of Directors of the International Association for Cannabinoid Medicines (IACM) as a patient representative.

    Nonetheless, Hodges worked with Dr William Notcutt to ensure GW Pharmaceuticals took up the issue and as a result Sativex is now available as an alternative.

    She also addressed the European Parliament in Brussels following which the law was change in Belgium.

    Due to deteriorating health as a result of her MS, Hodges handed over the articles and patient transcripts to the Wellcome Trust in 2009.

    "https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clare_Hodges"

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    Endocannabinoids in Multiple Sclerosis and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    There are numerous reports that people with multiple sclerosis (MS) have for many years been self-medicating with illegal street cannabis or more recently medicinal cannabis to alleviate the symptoms associated with MS and also amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). These anecdotal reports have been confirmed by data from animal models and more recently clinical trials on the ability of cannabinoids to alleviate limb spasticity, a common feature of progressive MS (and also ALS) and neurodegeneration. Experimental studies into the biology of the endocannabinoid system have revealed that cannabinoids have efficacy, not only in symptom relief but also as neuroprotective agents which may slow disease progression and thus delay the onset of symptoms. This review discusses what we now know about the endocannabinoid system as it relates to MS and ALS and also the therapeutic potential of cannabinoid therapeutics as disease-modifying or symptom control agents, as well as future therapeutic strategies including the potential for slowing disease progression in MS and ALS.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26408162
    Last edited by Sherman Peabody; 10-29-2017 at 02:37 PM.

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    Distinguished Community Member Sherman Peabody's Avatar
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    I was diagnosed with RRMS Christmas 2013 and you wouldn't believe how difficult it has been to get the medicine that I chose to use to manage my symptoms. That is cannabis, and man, it works every time. But how much better would it be if I could get access to particular strains which will alleviate specific symptoms. So I'm rambling now, what I really wanted to say was that personally I love LSD (lysergic acid diethylamide) for many purposes! Including, but not limited to, expanded, layered thinking! The torrents of creativity that fall from the mind like rain from the clouds! The glimpses beyond the veil of Maya, and just like your reasons, the way it makes me feel. Which is kinda like superman. And aside, man I've been using LSD since I was 16, and I wouldn't change it for the world! It helps one to find clarity in the chaos that we call home today! In my opinion it should not be illegal, moreover it should be an obligatory right of passage into adulthood.

    -K3el

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    I too have MS, and I can tell you from personal experiences that there are times when you feel like you're at death's door. There are also times when you just can't function. That's frustrating enough if you're on disability, living with excellent caretakers, and free of responsibility. But what about those who have children? What about those who have demanding jobs and refuse to let MS take that away from them? What about those of us who are graduate students? Many of the FDA-approved medications available for treating the debilitating symptoms of MS come with dangerous side effects, sometimes far more dangerous than the side effects of illegal drugs.

    I am a neuropharmacology and cognitive neuroscience researcher. There is absolutely no definitive evidence that drug use causes MS. And there is no definitive evidence that using illegal drugs can exacerbate MS. I don't think it's a good idea for anyone to regularly use illegal drugs (except of course, marijuana, and only if you have a condition for which its efficacy has been scientifically demonstrated). But, come on! MS SUCKS. If you can get a few hours of relief from this living hell now and again, I certainly won't judge you. I think the scientific community needs to broaden their minds and think outside the box where MS treatments are concerned.

    https://ehealthforum.com/health/ille...177245_20.html
    Last edited by Sherman Peabody; 10-31-2017 at 03:50 AM.

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