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Thread: OT July Chit Chat

  1. #21
    Distinguished Community Member Howie's Avatar
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    Cool

    Nothing about fleas, but we made it to 91 degrees here. I'm so proud.
    Roswell was a gift.

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  3. #22
    Distinguished Community Member jendie's Avatar
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    I haven't deserted this board... I've just been, oh shoot, I forgot what I was going to say. We had hot days here a week ago, but then normal June weather came back as it melted into July.

    I think the weather prediction for tomorrow was for the highs in the upper 70s - 80s, but now it's only looking like it will be in the low 70s. I'm not complaining, we had some super hot summers a few years in a row, but it looks like my region is cooling down to "normal" now.

    I'm not going to complain, there's a reason I live in the Pacific northwest, I love the cooler temps. It plays nicely with my heat intolerance. My mom gave me her portable air conditioner. It's set up in my living room, just in case the hot weather comes back.

    I am sunk in a mental funk lately, it seems that almost nothing is going right. I had received a couple calls about me potentially getting a couple caregivers, but they fell through. Having my power scooter is great, but it still takes what seems like forever to get things done.

    Maybe it's Tom's death that I'm just having a hard time getting through. He was my other half, my comic relief, my rock to cling to. Now he's gone and I'm falling apart. Maybe I should talk to my doctor.

    Mentally, I'm scattered. I keep losing things.

    Jendie
    I've been a member of this forum during its different incarnations since I was dx in 9/98


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  5. #23
    Distinguished Community Member jendie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by agate View Post
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    I haven't heard of a shot but there's Capstar, a tablet that kills fleas.

    Also there are the flea prevention treatments like Frontline and Advantage but they don't kill adult fleas. They just prevent fleas.
    My dog takes Comfortis to take care of fleas. It's a chewable that we get from his vet.

    Jendie
    I've been a member of this forum during its different incarnations since I was dx in 9/98


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  7. #24
    Distinguished Community Member agate's Avatar
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    Hi jendie,
    It's too bad that you've been going through a bad time. I've heard it takes at least a year to settle down after the death of someone very important in your life. If you let more time pass and slog on through it, you will find that gradually things are getting easier.

    Meanwhile, this place is here, and we have some comic relief now and then. Baby birds too!

    About that flea remedy you mentioned, I didn't know there was a chewable form of flea prevention available. That would be ever so much easier than the liquid I always had to get onto my cat's skin by drizzling it out of a little plastic container. Getting the top off the plastic container while holding onto a squirming cat wasn't so easy sometimes, and I ruined some of those pricey applicators.

    A couple of them were defective too. I did these routines every month for many years. Each of the last two cats was strictly indoors and had flea prevention but still there was the occasional flea.

    I saw only one flea but a couple of times there was a tapeworm, and so (I was told) there had to have been a flea. Treating the tapeworm was easy enough but also pricey.
    MS diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2002-2005. Copaxone 6/07 - 5/10.
    Member of this MS board since 2001.

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  9. #25
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    Hi Jendie,

    I was just thinking about you today -- wondering about that scooter.

    The major loss in my life, so far, was my sister w en she was 48 and I was 46. It took a long time to recover. With that little bit of experience, I'd say it was perfectly normal for you to feel at loose ends. And, yes, see your doctor. Any help you can get.

    Do you write in a journal? That practice has helped me process many things and find out things I did not know that I knew.

    I hope you find a caregiver.
    ANN
    There comes a time when silence is betrayal.- MLK

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  11. #26
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    Jendie, I also recommend reading some books on dealing with grief. I did after my husband passed away and it did help. Of course my Doctor knew so I didn't have to talk to him much. Time is really the biggest healer of all. Treat yourself as gently as you can. To the extent that you can do what you want to and nothing more. I was blessed that my MS had not become so active that I was in any way disabled, so I returned to work in six weeks. That and my dog were my saving grace.

    The bad part was that when he got sick I quit a job that I loved to just be with him and take care of him. He lived six months and six weeks after that I had to get a new job. I decided on part-time, but it was a blessing to have something to go to. I know this is not an option for you, so try to think of anything else that might take up some of your time.

    Ann, loosing a sister is certainly no small thing - it is very, very large.
    Virginia

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  13. #27
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    Grief is different for each person, and a person can grieve differently for each person lost. You just need to be gentle with yourself, not rush into things, just do what is necessary and not worry about the rest until it becomes necessary. Talking with someone is good, as is writing ... I don't know if you are religious, but sometimes ministers or priests can be helpful, or can direct you to grief counselors.

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  15. #28
    Distinguished Community Member BBS1951's Avatar
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    Joan Didion wrote an acclaimed book when she lost her husband , called The Year of Magical Thinking where she described losing her mind the first year.

    I think it takes 2 years to climb out of unspeakable grief. And the first year is the toughest. Go easy on yourself, of course your mind is unraveling. And you have the added challenges of illness on top of it.

    If you think it may help, go talk to a therapist. It can help to voice your feelings with an accepting person who won't be offended by your thoughts...

    https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/yea...032?type=eBook
    Last edited by BBS1951; 07-04-2017 at 10:25 AM.

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  17. #29
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    Jendie, my Aunt, who had also been widowed gave me a small book by C.S. Lewis called "A Grief Observed". Much later a movie was made out of that book. I found that it was small enough to get me started reading the things that I felt might help me. If you ever want to try it I feel sure the library would have it.
    Virginia

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  19. #30
    Distinguished Community Member agate's Avatar
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    Interesting that both those titles are mentioned in this article about books about grieving and mourning:

    http://www.newyorker.com/books/page-...r-the-grieving

    And years ago I read an excellent book--Death, Grief and Mourning in Contemporary Britain by Geoffrey Gorer (1965). The author interviewed about 400 families and found that death is often denied or treated hastily, leaving the mourners with nowhere to turn for support when they need it.
    MS diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2002-2005. Copaxone 6/07 - 5/10.
    Member of this MS board since 2001.

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