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Thread: Weird MS eye problems: Pulfrich phenomenon

  1. #11
    Distinguished Community Member Howie's Avatar
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    ON was my first symptom, and I was sent to get an MRI, and a DX, all in a matter of days. It's like a bad dream now, it was so long ago.
    "Moving to Montana soon, gonna be a dental floss tycoon."

    Frank Zappa

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  3. #12
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    I just realized that I might have had this in the past. It was in a rented apartment on the street where I met Peter).

    At least on two separate occasions, I thought the toilet was lower than it usual was and the sink was also lower and smaller. I had had R optic neuritis but this observation was so bizarre that I only told Peter. It was an "Alice through the looking glass" feeling.

    ANN
    There comes a time when silence is betrayal.- MLK

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  5. #13
    Distinguished Community Member agate's Avatar
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    At least on two separate occasions, I thought the toilet was lower than it usual was and the sink was also lower and smaller. I had had R optic neuritis but this observation was so bizarre that I only told Peter. It was an "Alice through the looking glass" feeling.
    This may be micropsia, which is also called Alice in Wonderland syndrome:


    https://www.merriam-webster.com/medical/micropsia
    MS diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2002-2005. Copaxone 6/07 - 5/10.
    Member of this MS board since 2001.

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  7. #14
    Distinguished Community Member Lazarus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Howie View Post
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    ON was my first symptom, and I was sent to get an MRI, and a DX, all in a matter of days. It's like a bad dream now, it was so long ago.
    Hi Howie,
    THat was pretty much my experience. ON, loss of green and red color in my vision, led to MRI and evoked potentials. Within a week I was told it was MS which I could not even pronounce clearly. It is like a bad dream now for me too. I like the way you put it.
    Linda~~~~

    Be the kind of woman that when your feet hit the floor each morning the devil says:"Oh Crap, She's up!"

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  9. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by agate View Post
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    This may be micropsia, which is also called Alice in Wonderland syndrome:


    https://www.merriam-webster.com/medical/micropsia
    Thank you, Agate! The weirdness just keeps coming.
    ANN
    There comes a time when silence is betrayal.- MLK

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  11. #16
    Distinguished Community Member agate's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lazarus View Post
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    Hi Howie,
    THat was pretty much my experience. ON, loss of green and red color in my vision, led to MRI and evoked potentials. Within a week I was told it was MS which I could not even pronounce clearly. It is like a bad dream now for me too. I like the way you put it.
    That loss of green and red color is something I still have at times but only in some situations, oddly. I never have it with traffic lights, for instance.

    Being unable to say "multiple sclerosis" should be considered as one of the tests for it. If you can't say it you just might have it. There are days when I can't say it, other days when I can, but it's always one of the harder pronunciation "challenges."
    MS diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2002-2005. Copaxone 6/07 - 5/10.
    Member of this MS board since 2001.

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  13. #17
    Distinguished Community Member Howie's Avatar
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    I think we get so use to calling it MS, we don't get much practice saying Multiple Sclerosis. At least I spelled it right.
    "Moving to Montana soon, gonna be a dental floss tycoon."

    Frank Zappa

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  15. #18
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    I've always had problems with depth perception. That's why playing baseball or tennis was nearly impossible: I couldn't tell where the ball was.

    When I first read about MS, the info stated that ON was the first symptom presented. For me it was the 2nd clearly identifiable episode. As I recovered, visual perception was a problem. Most objects seemed to be cut-outs set in a shoebox (I can't think of the name, but it was one option we used as a book report in grade school).

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    Distinguished Community Member jendie's Avatar
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    This Pulfrich-phenomenon was one of my presenting symptoms, but I didn't know this until I read about it just now. It would explain my lack of the ability to walk through doorways without incident. It started in 1976, when I got my first wrist watch when I was 7. I haven't owned a watch that does't end up with some kind of mark/scratch on the crystal in 41 years, no matter how hard I try. Even my Fitbit has a mark on it from accidentally colliding with a doorway or wall. My depth perception is also bad.

    I sprained my ankle when I was 13 and tried to jump over a parking curb in a parking lot.

    Jendie
    I've been a member of this forum during its different incarnations since I was dx in 9/98


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  19. #20
    Distinguished Community Member Howie's Avatar
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    Jendie, I've never been able to wear a watch for the same reason, it always got scratched and marked up. But I always just thought it was because I was a very active kid.

    Now days, I never wear a watch because I hate the feeling of them on my arm. Most men's watches are heavy. Besides, I really don't need to know the time these days.
    "Moving to Montana soon, gonna be a dental floss tycoon."

    Frank Zappa

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