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Thread: Whhelchairs

  1. #11
    Distinguished Community Member BBS1951's Avatar
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    The link was a dead end for my iPad, but this one works
    https://www.karmanhealthcare.com/product/ergo-flight/

    Thank you Jeannie. I guess I should go to the store as, other than weight, I don't comprehend the features, the pros and cons of each feature like different cushions, foot rests and so forth. I am looking for something easy to lift and store in car, safe to operate and easy to operate. I'm guess I should just look and learn!

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  3. #12
    Distinguished Community Member Howie's Avatar
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    Cool

    Yep, that one works. And it's LIGHT at a tad under 20 pounds. And from Karman, and I have a Karmann Ghia....it's a done deal!!!
    Roswell was a gift.

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  5. #13
    Distinguished Community Member agate's Avatar
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    I like the way the backrest folds down when the chair is collapsed.

    Among the options is a "UV resistant canopy top" but it's not pictured. I looked up some photos of them, and it could be a sort of umbrella, which could be very useful because I for one haven't figured out a way to propel my wheelchair with both hands while hanging onto an umbrella, and so I get drenched. My "answer" has been to wear a rainhat but it just keeps my head dry.

    I see it has regular bicycle-type spokes instead of the plastic substitutes I've been getting in recent years. I can't see that the plastic ones are an improvement over the metal ones.

    A couple of features that came with my freebie wheelchair are options that you pay for with this Karman chair--but they're not ultra-expensive: a seatbelt and the antitip wheels. They're both important to have, IMO.
    Last edited by agate; 03-27-2017 at 07:16 AM.
    MS diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2002-2005. Copaxone 6/07 - 5/10.
    Member of this MS board since 2001.

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  7. #14
    Distinguished Community Member Howie's Avatar
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    I assume you could add any of those features later if you felt one might be handy.
    Roswell was a gift.

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  9. #15
    Distinguished Community Member agate's Avatar
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    Yes, I'm sure you can--unless the company stops offering that feature.
    MS diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2002-2005. Copaxone 6/07 - 5/10.
    Member of this MS board since 2001.

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  11. #16
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    Many of the ultra light weight chairs are under 24 pounds, and some under 20. They're made of titanium. But the disadvantage often is, the lighter you go, the more expensive. My Quickie wheelchair (from spinlife) comes in at 24 pounds. When I was walking, I could load/unload it myself from the back of my car. Or if I pulled the driver seat up far enough, could load it behind me on the seat. The umbrella is a interesting concept in theory ... in practical terms, not so much. They're good as a sunblocker if you're sitting in one position, but if you're moving and the wind catches it (as it will..and will with a hand-held umbrella), it whips back, impaling anyone behind you, and pulling you backwards. Dangerous if it happens, say, in traffic.

    If you're going to be in the wheelchair for any length of time, than an air cushion is crucial. NOT having one is a major factor in the creation of my pressure sores. But if you're only using it for short term, you can get away with whatever cheaper cushion you want. I've never had a seatbelt; if your trunk is in good shape -- you can sit upright unaided-- you generally don't need one. The tipper bars are useful, but depending on how long they are, can hit the shins of a person trying to push you.

    Metal spokes on any wheel work independently ..which means they can loosen or tighten individually, causing the wheels to warp. The plastic spokes work as a unit, holding the wheels "round". The older chair..and now cheaper chairs..will have the bicycle spokes, whereas all the newer chairs have gone to the plastic spokes. They hold the wheel "round", and so keep the chair in alignment. An "aligned" chair will move evenly across the ground, assuming you're pushing yourself relatively evenly on both sides as you propel yourself along. A chair no longer in align will drift to one side, causing you to have to exert more pressure on that side to keep moving in a straight line. So you want the plastic spokes.

    The tilt of the footrests is really a comfort question, in most cases (unless you have some severe physical disability, like cerebral palsy, which requires specialized fitting). I prefer the footrest moving slightly out..although I'm also ok with them straight up/down. You want them swingaway -- a lever or catch to swing them out of the way when you're moving up to a desk or dining table, for example.

    An adjustable back is good for comfort. You can tighten or loosen Velcro straps both at the shoulder level and at the lower back level. But this adjustment isn't necessary really unless you're in the chair for long periods of time.
    ...I am not a doctor nor medical professional, and don't pretend to be one, here... :o

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  13. #17
    Distinguished Community Member BBS1951's Avatar
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    Cat, thank you so much for sharing your knowledge. All of your ur info is so helpful since I know zero about wc related issues. Thank you again.

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  15. #18
    Distinguished Community Member Earth Mother 2 Angels's Avatar
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    ((((((BBS)))))) ~

    You've received great advice and guidance.

    My sons had numerous specialized, custom chairs as their needs changed through the years. We actually have 3 old ones in our garage. If you lived close to us, you could have all 3!

    No matter how long you might be in the chair, you need comfortable seating, which provides proper support. We've used Roho cushions (which have air) on many chairs, and PTs have said these are the best cushions. You also want the back cushioned well with foam. It's important that there are no pressure points on your bum to cause skin breakdown. So, it might be advisable to start out with only an hour in the chair, then 2 hours, etc. until you can tolerate longer periods.

    I feel that a seat belt is a necessity for safety purposes. The safest restraint is a wheelchair vest. Here's an assortment of them:

    https://www.google.com/search?q=whee...h=1036#imgrc=_

    This is particularly helpful, when you are transported sitting in your wheelchair. But there are bumps in the sidewalk, and unexpected things can happen, so I think protecting yourself from falling forward out of your chair is important.

    It seems like we discussed seat belts and vests on a thread by agate and her adventures on a bus within the past few months. A fellow passenger slid out of her wheelchair. But I'm sleep deprived and could just be imagining that.

    I think it would be helpful for you to call and/or visit some local wheelchair suppliers. You might find places with showroom chairs you can sit in and try out. If you find a good supplier, who cares and is knowledgeable, that supplier should be able to identify a chair to meet all of your needs (light weight, easy to self-propel, comfortable, safe, etc.).

    I hope you find the perfect chair for you!

    Love & Light,

    Rose
    Mom to Jon, 47, (seizure disorder; Gtube; trache; colostomy; osteoporosis; hypothyroid; enlarged prostate; lymphedema, assorted mysteries) and Michael, 32, (intractable seizures; Gtube), who were born with an undiagnosed progressive neuromuscular disease and courageous spirits. Our Angel Michael received his wings in 2003 and now resides in Heaven. Our Angel Jon lives at home with me and Jim, the world's most wonderful dad.

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  17. #19
    Distinguished Community Member agate's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Earth Mother 2 Angels View Post
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    ...

    I feel that a seat belt is a necessity for safety purposes. The safest restraint is a wheelchair vest. Here's an assortment of them:

    https://www.google.com/search?q=whee...h=1036#imgrc=_

    This is particularly helpful, when you are transported sitting in your wheelchair. But there are bumps in the sidewalk, and unexpected things can happen, so I think protecting yourself from falling forward out of your chair is important.

    It seems like we discussed seat belts and vests on a thread by agate and her adventures on a bus within the past few months. A fellow passenger slid out of her wheelchair. But I'm sleep deprived and could just be imagining that.
    ...
    There was a discussion, Rose--and I was the one who was pitched out of my wheelchair while riding on a paratransit van. The driver had carelessly not tightened the van-supplied seatbelt very well but even if he had, I might still have been tossed out of the chair. He had to slam on his brakes because of a vehicle that suddenly cut in in front of him, or at least I think that's what happened. It was on a freeway and it all happened so fast that I'm not sure why he had to slam on his brakes.

    But ever since then I've been much more careful about the seatbelt issue and now use the seatbelt that goes with my chair in addition to the seatbelt the van uses.
    MS diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2002-2005. Copaxone 6/07 - 5/10.
    Member of this MS board since 2001.

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  19. #20
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    I always use whatever seat belts are available when riding in a vehicle! The rules in our cars is that the engine isn't turned on til the belts are buckled! I don't use pure transit much but if I did....same rule applies or I'm not going.

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