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Thread: Elevated brain temperature and MS fatigue

  1. #1
    Distinguished Community Member Lazarus's Avatar
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    Default Elevated brain temperature and MS fatigue

    I thought this was very interesting. For several reasons. I happen to now take aspirin almost daily because I have some idea that it inhibits the inflammatory MS that plagues me. Somehow I have put this idea together but I read so much that I have lost track!
    I take 3-4 baby aspirin a day, every other day, every three days....depends. It helps my toes a lot so I remember to take it when my toes are very painful to the touch.


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    Default STUDY: Elevated Brain Temp Associated w/Worse Fatigue in MSers
    Elevated Brain Temperature Is Associated with Worse Fatigue in Relapsing Remitting Multiple Sclerosis Patients (P2.172)

    Victoria Leavitt2, Alayar Kangarlu1, Feng Liu3, Claire Riley2 and James Sumowski4

    Abstract

    OBJECTIVE: To test the association of brain temperature and fatigue in patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS).

    BACKGROUND: Fatigue is a pervasive and debilitating symptom of RRMS. Our current ability to effectively treat MS fatigue is hindered by a poor understanding of its pathophysiology and likely multiple underlying etiologies. We recently reported endogenously elevated body temperature and its association to worse fatigue in RRMS patients. Elevated brain temperature was also recently reported in 108 RRMS patients compared to 103 healthy controls (Hasan et al, 2015). Here, we extend our temperature hypothesis of fatigue by investigating the association of elevated brain temperature and fatigue in RRMS patients.

    DESIGN/METHODS: 10 RRMS patients (8 female) served. Brain temperature was non-invasively measured with magnetic resonance spectroscopy (H-MRS) in a 3.0T Siemens Skyra scanner. Brain temperature was acquired from a 20x20x20mm voxel placed in right frontal cortex. Fatigue was measured with the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS).

    RESULTS: Average brain temperature in our sample was 37.59C +/- 1.10. Higher brain temperature was associated with worse fatigue (r=.354).

    CONCLUSIONS: These findings support elevated brain temperature as a candidate underlying mechanism for fatigue in RRMS. Cooling therapies to treat MS fatigue (i.e., aspirin, cooling garments) have shown efficacy in a small number of studies; however, these investigations did not consider endogenous temperature elevations as a target or explanation for treatment efficacy. Greater understanding/acknowledgment of elevated brain temperature and its consequences for patients with MS will support novel cooling treatments for fatigue. Brain temperature may be a sensitive outcome variable to consider for use in clinical trials."
    Linda~~~~

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  3. #2
    Distinguished Community Member agate's Avatar
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    Interesting. I wonder if this means that our brain temperature is higher than it should be because there is inflammation in our body?

    I've been taking 4 regular aspirin a day for years and years because of arthritis pain/swelling/inflammation. I take 2 in the AM and 2 in the PM. They're enteric coated. Maybe they're helping the MS as well--? They seem to be doing no harm at all.

    I was taking the maximum dosage of aspirin for a while but that was making my hearing worse. The doctor said I can take up to 4 a day. If I'm having acute pain I do take more than that or use Tylenol as a supplement to the aspirin.
    MS diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2002-2005. Copaxone 6/07 - 5/10.
    Member of this MS board since 2001.

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  5. #3
    Distinguished Community Member Howie's Avatar
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    That's really interesting. Linda, I would take them daily, and see how you feel. They are baby aspirin.

    Agate, what size are those? I would have to see how it works on my back, but a higher or more frequent dose.
    Roswell was a gift.

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    Distinguished Community Member agate's Avatar
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    Each aspirin pill I take is 325mg.
    MS diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2002-2005. Copaxone 6/07 - 5/10.
    Member of this MS board since 2001.

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    Distinguished Community Member Howie's Avatar
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    Thanks Agate!
    Roswell was a gift.

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  11. #6
    Distinguished Community Member SuzE-Q's Avatar
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    Linda,

    My MS doctor suggested I take a baby aspirin a day for MS fatigue too (it's also been shown to protect against some cancers, if I recall). Here's a study of MS and aspirin:

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4485640/

    Like you, I don't take it daily, but I do take it several times a week. I have no idea if it helps. I'd read that enteric coated wasn't as helpful (somewhere a long time ago, no idea where) so I take noncoated.

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