From: Terry S. Singeltary Sr.
Sent: Saturday, April 18, 2015 11:01 AM
To: BSE-L BSE-L
Cc: CJD-L ; CJDVOICE CJDVOICE ; bloodcjd bloodcjd
Subject: vCJD TEXAS CDC Emerging Infectious Diseases May 2015 Baylor College of Medicine Neuroscience 2014 case of human form of “mad cow disease” highlights need for continued surveillance

vCJD TEXAS CDC Emerging Infectious Diseases May 2015 Baylor College of Medicine Neuroscience 2014 case of human form of “mad cow disease” highlights need for continued surveillance


CDC: Emerging Infectious Diseases, Vol. 21, No. 5, May 2015 Baylor College of Medicine Neuroscience 2014 case of human form of “mad cow disease” highlights need for continued surveillance

CDC: Emerging Infectious Diseases, Vol. 21, No. 5, May 2015

By Newsroom America Feeds at 10:55 am Eastern

http://content.govdelivery.com/accou...lletins/ff4db5

Highlights: "Emerging Infectious Diseases", Vol. 21, No. 5, May 2015

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The articles of interest summarized below will appear in the May 2015 issues of "Emerging Infectious Diseases," CDC’s monthly peer-reviewed public health journal. This issue will feature vectorborne infections.

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Recent US Case of Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease—Global Implications,* Atul Maheshwari et al.

Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) is a rare neurologic disease that has no cure and is always fatal. Onset of illness takes many years to develop after initial exposure to the infectious organism. Emergence of this disease has been linked to consumption of contaminated beef from the United Kingdom during 1980–1996. In the United States, only 4 cases are known to have occurred. The source of exposure for the first 3 patients was probably consumption of beef while in the United Kingdom or Saudi Arabia, but the source of the most recent infection, in 2012, is less clear. This patient had lived in the United States for 14 years before becoming ill, but the evidence indicates that this patient’s exposure to contaminated beef occurred outside the United States more than a decade before onset of his illness. He had never stayed in the United Kingdom, France, or Saudi Arabia. He had, however, lived in 3 countries (Kuwait, Russia, and Lebanon) where he was most likely infected given the number of years the patient spent there and the amount of British beef imported from the UK during that time. His case highlights the persistent risk for acquiring this illness in unsuspected geographic locations and the need for continued global tracking and awareness.

http://www.newsroomamerica.com/story/487467.html

Baylor College of Medicine =Baylor College of Medicine News =Neuroscience =2014 case of human form of “mad cow disease” highlights need for continued surveillance

Dipali Pathak (713) 798-4710 Houston, TX - Apr 16, 2015 share 2014 case of human form of “mad cow disease” highlights need for continued surveillance

The identification of a patient who died from variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, the human form of “mad cow disease”, in Houston last year demonstrates the need for continued global tracking and awareness of the prion disorder, said an international consortium of physicians and public health experts led by those at Baylor College of Medicine. The report appeared online in the journal Emerging Infectious Diseases.

The case at a local hospital was the fourth to be confirmed in the United States so far, said Dr. Atul Maheshwari, assistant professor in the departments of neurology and neuroscience at Baylor and first author of the report, who cared for the patient. The disease first emerged in the United Kingdom between 1980 and 1996, where it was linked to contaminated beef. The first three U.S. cases were also thought to have occurred because the patients ate beef while in the United Kingdom or Saudi Arabia, which acquired much of its beef from the United Kingdom.

The patient had lived in the United States for 14 years before becoming ill. While he had never visited the United Kingdom, France or Saudi Arabia, he had lived in Kuwait, Lebanon and Russia—all of which imported UK beef during the time that the disease was at its greatest.

Maheshwari believes that the patient was exposed to the contaminated beef outside the United States more than a decade before he became sick. There is also no evidence that this patient transmitted the disease to anyone else.

“This article will alert physicians to the possibility that patients might have this illness, even though they were exposed over 10 years ago,” he said.

Others who took part in this research include Alicia Parker, Aarthi Ram, Clay Goodman and Joseph S. Kass, all of Baylor; Michael Fischer of Texas Department of State Health Services: Pierluigi Gambetti and Yvonne Cohen of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine in Cleveland, Ohio; Claudio Soto and Luis Concha-Marambio of The University of Texas Medical School at Houston; Ermias D. Belay, Ryan A. Maddox and Lawrence B. Schonberger of the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, Georgia; Simon Mead of the London Institute of Neurology in the United Kingdom; and Haitham M. Hussein of HealthPartners Clinics & Services in St. Paul, Minnesota.

https://www.bcm.edu/news/neuroscienc...ad-cow-disease

Greetings,

In my opinion, with the available science and history of the TSE prion in North America, in many different species, the history on mad cows in Texas, the history mad cow feed in Texas, the history on CJD in humans in Texas, the assumption that the latest nvCJD case in Texas was from British Beef as the number one assumption, is preposterous. There is as much, if not more risk factor for this gentleman to have acquired the nvCJD from a USA/TEXAS source, as there is anywhere else in the world. In fact, I believe the BSE TSE Prion disease originated in the USA.

I would kindly like to evaluate the latest science on the Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy TSE sporadic Creutztfeldt Jakob Disease sCJD, and Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy BSE, and it’s many different variants or phenotypes i.e. the atypical TSE prion, and the history of mad cows and the unusual cases of CJD TSE Prioin disease in Texas. ...

Thank You,

kind regards, terry

SNIP...


Saturday, April 18, 2015

vCJD TEXAS CDC Emerging Infectious Diseases May 2015 Baylor College of Medicine Neuroscience 2014 case of human form of “mad cow disease” highlights need for continued surveillance

http://vcjd.blogspot.com/2015/04/vcj...nfectious.html


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